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Thread: Load Bearing Brickwork

  1. #1
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    Load Bearing Brickwork

    We show load bearing brickwork below slabs and beams by using a hatch pattern. Is there a way one can do it on Revit without using fill regions? Below is a sample of what it should look like:

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Load Bearing Brickwork-lbb.jpg  

  2. #2
    Forum Addict elton williams's Avatar
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    If your cut plane is within the walls extents it will show the cut pattern automatically. It'll do it in section too. And rcp. And 3D. Unless you tell Revit not to.

    Welcome to the forum
    Last edited by elton williams; February 1st, 2018 at 09:12 AM.

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    Thanks for the response and the welcome.

    Maybe I am misunderstanding your answer, but what I want to show is brickwork below the slab and not above. I.e. if the slab is located at say level 3000 and it is supported by brickwork located between level 0 to 3000, I want my structural plan (whose cut plane is located above 3000) to show a hatched area where the wall below is located.

    Hope this explains my issue better.

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    the short answer is yes its possible.
    The longer answer is that to achieve this, you need to do one of 3 manipulations for your sheet view.

    First is to put your plan views in wireframe mode, and then manage everything with filters. This works well but working in wireframe will make every face visible, and this can be complicated if you have sloped elements.

    Second option is to just put a transparency on your slab elements and wall elements, then you need again to use filters for your load bearing elements and other elements Under to appear properly.

    Third option is to split your plans up into two plans one showing the load bearing walls Under un a seperate view you need to set the walls to be transparent and in your VG options turn off everything else except walls/doors/windows, and the other showing the slab and elements above slab in another seperate view. When you go to your sheet presentation you then need to place the "elements over" view first, then slide the "load bearing elements" view and superpose it over the "elements over" view. It will snap into place and on the sheet will look like one view when it is in fact two views overlayed.

    Each option has its own set of complications and advantages - I actually prepare BOTH options when I make a Template because some technicians prefer to work one way over the other. As long as everyone in the project knows which one to use its ok - ideally 1 view in wireframe mode is actually easier to manage in a large project because for each slab plan you need 2 plans with the other method. If Im doing a 70 story high rise that means 140 plans to manage, instead of 70. So it quickly gets complicated. Then if I need to break a project up into zones, and different pour stages, my number of plans to manage quickly gets large and complicated to manage. Having said that, its not impossible, its just more of a pain to manage.

    When I do my filters for the first option, I base them on "wall" and then "structural material = masonry" (for your example).
    Then I just need to manage the "projection" graphics for the elements Under the slab.
    I also need to manage the same wall material in "cut" but I create a 2nd filter and manage the cut graphics in that one.
    So for each wall material I will have 2 filters.
    1. Load bearing masonry Under (manage projection hatch/linestyle/colors)
    2. Masonry over (manage cut hatch/linestyle/colors)
    cganiere and mjajansen like this.

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    This is awesome! Works like a charm.

    Since my initial post I also found the following method. It is a permutation of your third method, where instead of using two separate views when placing them on sheet, you use the underlay feature. The line types are then also controlled using filters. The disadvantage of using this method is that in order for the underlay to show walls, you have to split the walls in question and then hide them in the parent view. This is due to the fact that an underlay does not show anything that is within the view range of the parent view.

    This is a somewhat limited explanation of my method. If someone is interested in a proper write-up I will be happy to share.

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    Forum Addict elton williams's Avatar
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    Those methods might all work ok but details like this would typically be shown in section.

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    I agree, but in this specific instance we want to ensure that certain areas of brickwork are not used as load bearing.

    Thanks for the feedback

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    Elton, this dépends on your region really. Australia we like to show load bearing elements Under in plan views, and non load bearing elements are either left out entirely, or shown in a half-tone sort of deal where they are less apparant on the plan.

    Where I am now in Europe, they like to show their structural plans looking from underneath the slab and seeing the load bearing elements that impact over the slab (so basically take how its done in Oz and look from Under the slab instead of over it.)
    Took me a while to adjust.

    But détails are fine but I dont want to have to detail every load bearing wall, much easier to show them in plan with another type of hatch and hidden line and then a typical detail for the load bearing connection to slab.
    mjajansen likes this.

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