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Thread: Multiple models developed over five years need to come together in one model

  1. #1
    Junior Member LindseyMcLaughlin's Avatar
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    Multiple models developed over five years need to come together in one model

    Hey everyone, We are the structural engineers for our local hospital, and have been for about twenty years. The hospital was developed in phases, as I am sure most are. We have individual models representing the individual phases; 1948, 1959, 1972, etc. We are trying to develop a master file that has all of the buildings/phases of construction together in one project. I am at a loss as to how to approach this. Part of the problem being that when we started developing all of these models (a million years ago) we did not have the foresight to know that we would potentially want to bring them together. So they are not set up with coordinates or project base points that provide any relevance in regards to how the buildings go together. We do have one set of shared coordinates provided by the civil engineers. I guess I'm just hoping someone can give me a jumping off point. I really just can't decide where to start, or how to go about bringing all of these models together. Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    Separate buildings or one building? If one building they ought to have a common collection of grids?

    If multiple buildings, create a site model using the civil data. Link the building models and line each of them up with the site position and then align each discipline's model (if any) by their own references (grids/levels) to each other. You can publish coordinates from the site model to the individual models so they can then be linked to each other (if necessary) using By Shared Coordinates.

    If a single building built in separate models, link and align them (if necessary) and then bind them. You may need to clean up warnings and clean up/eliminate groups (ungroup) to get the bind to complete. There are more subtleties to explore but not worth digging in further now if you're dealing with separate buildings.

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    Junior Member LindseyMcLaughlin's Avatar
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    It's a bit of both actually. One building developed over the years, with a total of five models; and then the surrounding buildings. The parking garage is the only model with coordinates from civil established.

  4. #4
    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    What is the big picture? Do they want a single model to represent the existing conditions so new work can be planned? Do they want to be able to retreat to seeing individual past work according to that phase/state?

    It might be a good time to undertake building a new model based on the acquired knowledge and experience of the past models but perhaps not of them. Doing that would/could eliminate past model warnings, shortcuts taken, errors, modelling decisions/choices and more.

    Regardless, if you choose to combine existing models you need to establish a common reference point between them, ideally grids/levels. You also need to make sure each model has exactly the same phase configuration (phase, phase filters). This way you can bind models and then make sure those elements are associated with the correct phase.
    Last edited by Steve_Stafford; July 15th, 2019 at 04:20 PM.

  5. #5
    Junior Member WelcomeToAccord's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    I would take one of two routes: I would go into each individual model and set their elevations and coordinates to match, merely by selecting all the components and changing their elevations.

    Steve_Stafford's idea is a great second choice: Link your existing models, one-by-one, into a new project, and create a new model that's clean and incorporates all the information from the other models. You might be able to copy and paste most of your components into the new model and set their properties to match each other.

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