Показано с 1 по 7 из 7

Тема: Drainage Piping Dilema

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Регистрация
    14.06.2011
    Адрес
    CT, USA
    Сообщений
    601
    Местное время
    07:12

    Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Drainage Piping Dilema

    I'm implementing Revit in a small office that has been doing 2D AutoCAD up until now. They do supply and drainage on the same plan and currently show drainage piping serving the fixtures on a level on the fixture's level plan, not on the level below where it actually resides. I know I can do this in Revit but I'm not sure it's going to be worth the effort.

    Is anyone doing this regularly? If so, what is your methodology? Should I try to accomplish this in one view or should I aim for overlapping supply and drainage views on the same sheet?

    It seems to me that overlapping views would be less problematic and would put less responsibility on the user to set the appropriate parameters so that filters work as designed but that makes annotating difficult.

    Is there a lesser of two evils that I could use until I get them to see the light and switch to showing the piping by level.

    I'm referencing an old thread on Autodesk Discussion Forum as it hits the obvious relevant points, https://forums.autodesk.com/t5/revit...s/td-p/5438528.
    Последний раз редактировалось RobDraw; 21.12.2018 в 15:01.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Регистрация
    14.06.2011
    Адрес
    CT, USA
    Сообщений
    601
    Местное время
    07:12

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I'm glad to hear that no one is doing this. I'm also glad to say that it looks like I won't have to. After doing some more reading about different ways to accomplish this, I decided to address the presentation issues and so far it doesn't seem like it's going to be much of a battle to sway the interested parties over from the dark side.

  3. #3
    Member
    Регистрация
    22.02.2013
    Сообщений
    345
    Местное время
    08:12

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I've been using this program for 8 years now and I'm still wrestling with making plumbing drawings presentable. Of all the disciplines plumbing has the biggest gap between "how it's drawn" and "how it gets built" and there's no right answer when you're trying to design in Revit. Model it how you THINK it'll be built and it looks like garbage in a plan view. Model it how it's "supposed to look" on a CAD plan you're creating fake clashes with other disciplines. IMO, the second option is the lesser of two evils since very few GCs are using the Revit model anyway.

    I'm in the minority but I'm a supporter of treating the DWV piping like any other service above a ceiling: if the piping is in the 2nd floor ceiling serving 3rd floor fixtures, it goes on a 2nd floor plan. I'm sick of killing myself trying to make Revit look like CAD. But I will make lots of part plans, sections and 3D "isometric" views to help the plumber visualize what's going on. I also don't bind myself to traditional 1/8" and 1/4" drawing scales. If I need to go 1/2" or larger to make it legible then so be it. I get push-back on this from older supervisors but it's the path of least resistance. Making new views is a huge pain in CAD but it's one of Revit's strengths so I say use it. Plus it fills up a sheet and makes it look like you did a lot.
    Последний раз редактировалось Necro99; 02.01.2019 в 20:59.

  4. #4
    Forum Addict Аватар для josephpeel
    Регистрация
    03.05.2012
    Сообщений
    1,402
    Местное время
    14:12

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Had the same question from a client recently.. the answer was "No. The second floor plan shows the piping on the second floor, because it is on the second floor"...
    No point in making it more difficult than it is. If they really want to they can open 2 drawings next to each other.

    Another dilemma is double or single line. A PM wanted a combined water and waste drawing with water piping and valves in single line with the valves shown as symbols but waste piping shown as double line. Theres no way to overide detail level so its just not possible without stacked views.

    Something I have been trying recently, which some people like, is showing all the installations on every drawing but greyed out if not relevant. So the relevant system is clearly shown with black lines and where it is in relation to everything else is still visible. Also trying to get away from loads of different line types and abbreviation tags for each system. Just show one system on each drawing set with the context in grey and its pretty clear whats what. You can also auto tag a drawing of a single system without any overlapping tags.
    Yes you get a lot of drawings but they are almost always issued as PDFs and you can do some great stuff with links. For example put View Reference links on one side of the drawing for the same level and all the disciplines and for all the levels with the same discipline. That way someone can be looking at one sheet in the PDF and click back and forth to check the other floors or systems.
    I made a PDF document like this for a factory with lots of odd level heights and buildings. It was a huge file but it was really easy to navigate to any drawing using the section/overview on the first page or the links on each sheet. Unfortunately placing and setting the links was manual work but its probably possible to do something with dynamo.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Регистрация
    14.06.2011
    Адрес
    CT, USA
    Сообщений
    601
    Местное время
    07:12

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    [QUOTE=Necro99;213534]I've been using this program for 8 years now and I'm still wrestling with making plumbing drawings presentable. Of all the disciplines plumbing has the biggest gap between "how it's drawn" and "how it gets built" and there's no right answer when you're trying to design in Revit. Model it how you THINK it'll be built and it looks like garbage in a plan view. Model it how it's "supposed to look" on a CAD plan you're creating fake clashes with other disciplines. IMO, the second option is the lesser of two evils since very few GCs are using the Revit model anyway.QUOTE]

    I'm going to have to disagree with you on modeling it so it looks good on paper. I'm looking forward to the day when designers start making their models in a way that contractors can actually use them. We designers need to let go of some of the old drafting traditions. Plumbing sometimes just can't be shown well in a plan view. I did a large renovation project years ago that had so little space above the ceilings that most of the distribution was primarily vertical. The plan views were chock full of references to sections.
    Последний раз редактировалось RobDraw; 04.02.2019 в 12:44.

  6. #6
    Member
    Регистрация
    22.02.2013
    Сообщений
    345
    Местное время
    08:12

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Цитата Сообщение от RobDraw Посмотреть сообщение
    I'm going to have to disagree with you on modeling it so it looks good on paper. I'm looking forward to the day when designers start making their models in a way that contractors can actually use them. We designers need to let go of some of the old drafting traditions.
    I'm with you on that, maybe we should start our own company. But for now the people I work for have about a 10 second attention span whenever the old "Revit vs. AutoCAD" discussion comes up. Their eyes glaze over and then they end the discussion with "Just make it look like it's supposed to look." And honestly I don't want to push my luck, I've pushed the Revit transition about as far as I can at this company.
    Последний раз редактировалось Necro99; 04.01.2019 в 22:16.

  7. #7
    Member
    Регистрация
    22.02.2013
    Сообщений
    345
    Местное время
    08:12

    Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Цитата Сообщение от josephpeel Посмотреть сообщение

    Something I have been trying recently, which some people like, is showing all the installations on every drawing but greyed out if not relevant. So the relevant system is clearly shown with black lines and where it is in relation to everything else is still visible.
    I do this as well, but I get "push back" from people who think that I'm drawing the same objects twice on two separate "Revit Drawings." They're so rooted in the CAD mindset that they don't realize it's a single model and that they're looking at the same objects in both views.

Похожие темы

  1. Using a Piping System Schedule to replace Piping Specifications
    от Necro99 в разделе MEP - General
    Ответов: 13
    Последнее сообщение: 26.06.2017, 16:02
  2. Scheduling HVAC piping apart from Plumbing piping
    от BenMiller в разделе MEP - General
    Ответов: 7
    Последнее сообщение: 24.07.2014, 19:54
  3. Drainage fittings?
    от nick_h в разделе MEP - Family Creation
    Ответов: 2
    Последнее сообщение: 19.12.2013, 19:47
  4. Drainage Slope Feature
    от domsib в разделе MEP - General
    Ответов: 4
    Последнее сообщение: 13.11.2013, 15:13
  5. Drainage
    от stuhall в разделе Structure - General Questions
    Ответов: 2
    Последнее сообщение: 09.10.2011, 08:23

Ваши права

  • Вы не можете создавать новые темы
  • Вы не можете отвечать в темах
  • Вы не можете прикреплять вложения
  • Вы не можете редактировать свои сообщения
  •