Donate Now Goal amount for this year: 2500 USD, Received: 2249 USD (90%)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Precast Insulated Wall Panels

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    October 6, 2015
    Posts
    4
    Current Local Time
    11:12 AM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Precast Insulated Wall Panels

    Hello everyone, my first post. I have been study Revit for my company the past several months. We are looking to make shop drawings for precast in the near future. Look forward to the exciting journey of Revit.
    Lots of pros and cons from AutoCad to Revit. But seems Revit will only get better. I pretty much got it dialed in except a few things.
    I still can't figure how to block out insulation around plates and different areas. I attached a pdf of examples of what im trying to achieve. I have been using dividing parts. But I seem to can't customize it in vertical sections. I have used this
    http://www.aga-cad.com/blog/how-to-model-complex-precast-wall-panels-using-revit-parts
    the last part of the article is what I am trying to achieve. Any ideas or tips?
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #2
    Senior Member chris.macko's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 12, 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    534
    Current Local Time
    11:12 AM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I'd look at creating a wall hosted or face based generic model for the blockouts. As long as you assign the same material to the blockout as the concrete in the wall, they should join together and look like your images.

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    October 6, 2015
    Posts
    4
    Current Local Time
    11:12 AM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Creating wall & face based generic models I was able to get the blockouts for the precast concrete, but not the insulation. You mean try to make another extrusion in the wall (to where i want insulation to become concrete) and make extrusion material to precast concrete?

  4. #4
    Senior Member chris.macko's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 12, 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    534
    Current Local Time
    11:12 AM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I'd use the layers of the wall tool for the concrete and insulation, and then use a separate family for the blockouts around openings. In the past I've built that into my window and door frames for precast, but it seems like now all the precast manufacturers we deal with can do edge to edge insulation so it's less of an issue.

  5. #5
    New Member
    Join Date
    October 6, 2015
    Posts
    4
    Current Local Time
    11:12 AM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    ok I got it to work the way you said. . But the one issue when I do the scheduling in the shop drawing. It did subtract the volume of the insulation for me. But it did not add the concrete volume the replaces the insulation? I guess I'll have to work with the schedule with a calculated parameter.

  6. #6
    Moderator snowyweston's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 21, 2010
    Location
    C.LONDON
    Posts
    4,408
    Current Local Time
    05:12 PM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    I would abandon the parts workflow post-haste if your bread & butter is precast work. Parts offer a sound workflow for one-off detailing exercises, but come the moment you're requested to produce an entire building model of said precast, Parts quickly lose their lustre.

    Similarly, Chris' idea of using cutting-elements on basic walls, whilst sound for spatial arrangement and visual articulation, will not cut the mustard come componentisation and scheduling.

    Personally, I'm all about Curtain panels for SIPs & such.

  7. #7
    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 7, 2010
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    10,418
    Current Local Time
    11:12 AM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by snowyweston View Post

    Similarly, Chris' idea of using cutting-elements on basic walls, whilst sound for spatial arrangement and visual articulation, will not cut the mustard come componentisation and scheduling.

    Personally, I'm all about Curtain panels for SIPs & such.
    Thats not exactly true. Basic walls, with cutting components, and model groups to "componentize" the Panels themselves, can and does work fine, as long as you manage the wall joins with Disallow Join. I would actually wager that it works as well (or better) than using the Revit Curtain Wall tool for panelization, since the panels in the RCW can still slightly change sizes, as the "grids" move around in the CW.

    Ive got entire structural models here done (some that were SIP and some that were tilt up panels), where all of the panels (and reveals, and joints) were done with simple Basic Walls, and face based or wall hosted families, and Model Groups.

  8. #8
    Moderator snowyweston's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 21, 2010
    Location
    C.LONDON
    Posts
    4,408
    Current Local Time
    05:12 PM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
    Thats not exactly true.
    Quite. I guess it's because whenever I hear 'precast' I think of panels that are more than just a planar form - I'm sure basic walls can suffice a lot of the time - but as soon as you need to start thinking about multiple-mold-poured-panels, I struggle too see how they'd accommodate such.

  9. #9
    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
    Join Date
    December 7, 2010
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    10,418
    Current Local Time
    11:12 AM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    Very fair point. But, the same is true for Curtain Wall Components, once the panels become *nonregular* in elevation. Certainly, non regular in SECTION is easier to achieve with the CW tool and CWP Components, for sure. You CAN accomplish it with basic walls, using hosted components as voids that cut away at the concrete. Its how i did the entire warehouse i had to do, that had a lot of reveal work in it.

    I guess it really is just picking your poison.

  10. #10
    Senior Member chris.macko's Avatar
    Join Date
    April 12, 2011
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    534
    Current Local Time
    11:12 AM

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!
    There are obviously some different needs here from the shop drawing side compared to the design side. I've looked into using curtain panels for precast and tilt-up walls, but the main issue I had is that it's much harder to drop doors and windows in, especially early on in the process when things are still moving around a lot. If you're at the shop drawing level and the design is set, and panel repetition and optimization is the goal, I think CW's could make a lot more sense. For me it's still going to be basic walls with hosted reveals and sweeps any day.

Similar Threads

  1. Creating precast brick clad sandwich panels
    By fng_RVTstr in forum Architecture and General Revit Questions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: December 6th, 2015, 03:59 PM
  2. Scheduling precast concrete sandwich-panels
    By Rvto in forum Structure - General Questions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: November 10th, 2015, 01:54 PM
  3. Methods for Modelling Precast/Complex Wall Panels
    By Yorgan in forum Architecture and General Revit Questions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: April 2nd, 2015, 10:49 PM
  4. Handles on Insulated Dampers
    By TFuller in forum MEP - General
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: July 1st, 2014, 04:52 PM
  5. Precast Wall Questions
    By JasonWallis in forum Structure - General Questions
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: May 9th, 2012, 08:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •