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Thread: How to model existing building for multiple purposes as a living document.

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    Junior Member jpeter78's Avatar
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    How to model existing building for multiple purposes as a living document.

    I have been tasked with modeling an existing building, we'll call it a hospital, but it really doesn't matter what it is. This building then will be used for space tracking, pressurization checking and code footprint/life safety for the owner and state... so a lot of data that will never be used for construction, but needs to be as accurate as we can get it. We are mostly using it for the room data and less so for the actual layout, but the code footprint requires accuracy for walltypes, etc.

    The real question is, since this will be a living document, what hiccups should I look out for? We are constantly doing projects at this facility. What is the best way to maintain current, built, plans of the current floors after a project wraps out? Linking in the project model? Copying in walls/doors/windows/casework?

    That is the information I have as of now. I am waiting on the list of parameters that will be going into the project, which I can only assume will be several shared parameters to get the data in and out.

    Any advice you can give on how to accomplish this never-ending documentation will be very appreciative!

    John

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    Junior Member jpeter78's Avatar
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    Modelling an existing building isn't a challenge, modeling a building for staffing modifications and analysis isn't a problem. But what is the best practice for having multiple projects happen, sometimes simultaneously, to an existing building?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jpeter78 View Post
    Modelling an existing building isn't a challenge, modeling a building for staffing modifications and analysis isn't a problem. But what is the best practice for having multiple projects happen, sometimes simultaneously, to an existing building?
    Just thinking out loud a bit ...

    I could see this as being one place that design options might shine ... but MEP folks can't run their calcs in design options, so I'm not sure how feasible that really is.

    Phases could work, but what if phase 3 comes together and is completed before phase 1?

    Would this be a practical use for worksets? I know many folks advocate limiting worksets, but perhaps?

    As I said, just thinking "out loud". Unfortunately, I think whichever way you go, it's gonna be messy.

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    Moderator cellophane's Avatar
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    I went to a class at RTC this past year where they discussed a similar condition for a fairly large hospital campus.

    The method they used was to keep a master model with the most current conditions with worksets & links as needed. The general workflow for each renovation was to create a new file, copy in the relevant information and make their modifications, then copy it all back into the master as an as-built once completed. I'm checking with the RTC folks - if they are OK with it I'll get you a copy of the handout.

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    Forum Addict GMcDowellJr's Avatar
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    I would think a model of the existing building linked into a series of new models (which are also cross-linked into each other) would be a reasonable approach. You can set up the linked models to show relative existing/new work easily enough. That there might be work that crosses the boundaries between files is more an issue of the project than it is Revit... I mean that's going to be a challenge regardless of which approach you take to documentation.

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    Junior Member jpeter78's Avatar
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    Cellophane -- That would be much appreciated. If I cut and paste between projects, I chose how much data goes into the master model vs linking in a bunch of crud I don't necessarily want/need in there.

    GMcDowellJr -- I'm entertaining that option as well, but seems like a royal PITA with a lot of extra data loaded for no good reason....

    CADiva -- That approach might work if I was not afraid of how the users might butcher the model. Seems like a lot of information to be giving free access to.

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    Forum Addict GMcDowellJr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpeter78 View Post
    I'm entertaining that option as well, but seems like a royal PITA with a lot of extra data loaded for no good reason....
    What do you mean by "data"? Information in Parameters? Linked file parameters don't clutter up the host file. If by data you mean model geometry then yes... but I would assume you'd want all of that?

    To clarify -- you've got a large existing building that will, over time and possibly overlapping, undergo a series of remodeling efforts and you want to build a Revit model to document all of the above as well as allow for code studies, asset tracking, etc.... does that sound right?

    I still think that cross-linking is the way to go. Once you've completed the work in the remodel file (selectively demoing stuff in the existing) you could bind the link in the existing file so that model geometry was part of the new existing model for the next remodel.

    -----------

    Also... how's KC treating you? Smoked any good cuts of meat lately?

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    Junior Member jpeter78's Avatar
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    Cross-linking has a lot of merit. Seems the most logical... Our current path for this building is pulling in the linework from AutoCAD for the code footprint, etc... I guess I am concerned that the linked files will end up bogging down the model and if I only bring in the walls/doors/windows/casework that it will be lighter???

    And yes, your generalized statement is right on for clarification sake.

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