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Thread: The Revit Outcast

  1. #1
    Member EarthRevi's Avatar
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    The Revit Outcast

    I have fallen into a very hard position and I'm not sure where else to talk about it. I think this might be the space, maybe someone else has or is experiencing this. I began working with a larger firm last January, coming into a role that was newly created for as a Revit modeler - mostly because either no one wanted to learn Revit, or Modeling is really new to this firm. Maybe a combination of both. With that being said, the template and protocol for Revit projects is very minimal. I dont have a lot of experience with managing models, and maybe I got in over my head taking this position on.

    There have been a lot of resources out there that I have used for help, like this forum ( I don't know what I would do without this community) and linkedin learning's Paul Aubdin and Eric Wing. And of course, the google. I am managing, but its really hard because I don't really have any resources in my office to go to for Revit/Technical help. Or out of my office, actually. Because I am a drafter/modeler -- I don't really get to participate in meetings or any of the industry events that would give me opportunity to meet others using Revit.

    The hardest part though, is everyone here hates Revit. They devalue it constantly and they don't have much trust in it. I do my best to to not take it personally but, its really hard when the primary software I work in everyday is seen as an annoyance and not very trustworthy. I hear this a lot "Why do we even need Revit in Engineering, its pointless" and they find a lot of comfort in AutoCAD because its safe. When possible, the firm will avoid working in Revit, even if we get a Revit Model. They will create the project in AutoCAD instead. The other problem is, I dont have much experience in construction and building methods-- SO I have two uphill battles. Understanding Building enough to produce correct construction documents, and also learning about customization in Revit.

    I do like working here, but at times because I am so young in my career I don't know if I'm in the right role. And, its hard to be in a role where there is also little value or trust in the software I work in.

    Thanks for reading

  2. #2
    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    Honestly? I would find another job, seriously.

    In my opinion, understanding the Building Systems is paramount. If you dont understand the systems, or have a very good understanding of what you are modeling and why, chances are Revit isnt even going to pay its dividends in helping you solve problems, since all it is being used for is inputting what someone else dictates to you. To learn the building systems, you need a good mentor. If they are already not excited about what you are doing there, and arent including you in project meetings and discussions, i wouldnt wager the mentorship there is very strong.

    And after you get passed all of that, they dont sound very forward thinking or willing to change.

    I dont see a single upside to staying there, other than punching a time clock and getting paid. And there is nothing wrong with that, of course. But IF there is an opportunity somewhere to be an EIT, working on Projects under an Engineers mentorship (NOT managing Revit, NOT trying to be a change agent for the company, NOT focusing on customizing Revit, NOT going to Revit Events and conferences) i would take it. Get the industry knowledge you need, and the software stuff happens over time.

  3. #3
    The Moderator with No Imagination MPwuzhere's Avatar
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    Sounds exactly like the position I had before Aaron hired me...(previous company)... I was the only Revit modeler and I had to practically beg to have a project in Revit.

  4. #4
    Moderator Robin Deurloo's Avatar
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    Well you are in a difficult position for sure.
    In a company I worked for we started Revit with just 2 of us and there was an aversion to it as well, but I took that as my mission to prove them wrong and of course in the end they told me that they should have done this much sooner. But I had to go through some interesting discussions about time, money and the look of the drawings for example and yes it took longer, cost more money and the drawings did not look as good in the beginning, but they can not expect you to know everything right from the start is both you and the company are new to Revit.

    That said they still do some projects in AutoCAD and I have no clue why (I don't work there anymore). I had the benefit that I was confident in my knowledge of construction, so I just had 1 battle to fight and there were a few very good construction people around that could help with any problem I encountered in that department as well.

    But if you are new to the construction business and new to Revit and have taken the job to set up the company Revit standards AND work on projects. I would probably take Aaron's advise.

  5. #5
    Member HansLammerts's Avatar
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    Serious advice. Learn AutoCAD also. Use the best if both worlds (left hand 2d cad right hand 3d bim) and your fellow workers will appreciate it..

  6. #6
    Senior Member DavidLarson's Avatar
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    Cut and run. That company is hellbent on remaining dinosaurs. When VR becomes commonplace in only a few more years anybody stuck in AutoCAD will be ignored.

  7. #7
    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    If this company does quality work, you like the people you work with, can learn from them and you've got a lot to learn then do that. Learn what you can from them. Start planning for your next company in the meantime.

    Think about what kind of work makes you want to get up each morning. Are you willing/able to move? A Revit savvy MEP person capable of implementing Revit for a firm that wants to do this can just about name their price these days (if you can live up to that expectation). A Revit savvy engineer is also in demand.
    tidalwave1 likes this.

  8. #8
    Member EarthRevi's Avatar
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    Thanks you guys. I really appreciate the time and advice.
    I have a lot to think about over the weekend.

  9. #9
    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    Quote Originally Posted by EarthRevi
    ...I have a lot to think about over the weekend...
    It won't be your last time either... all firms struggle with the same problem - people
    EarthRevi, LKeyser, JeffH and 5 others like this.

  10. #10
    Autodesk JeffH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve_Stafford View Post
    ... all firms struggle with the same problem - people
    The lowest common denominator. Only trumping old familiar habits by a little bit.
    Dave Jones likes this.

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