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Thread: Architectural Question regarding finding project materials and colors?

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    Forum Addict tzframpton's Avatar
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    Question Architectural Question regarding finding project materials and colors?

    General question here for the architecturally savvy: are there usually areas in a set of contract documents that spell out clearly any materials and colors for interiors and exteriors in an easy-to-read format and an all-in-one location? I'm wanting to create a little more consistency with my Navisworks BIM models and I don't want to search for scattered info here or there. Is there usually something like this that exists on projects that I can refer to? Thanks in advance!

    -TZ

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    Forum Addict GMcDowellJr's Avatar
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    There is, or should be, a finish legend (really a schedule but that’s what it’s always been called) in the set listing that information. Not everyone uses it for exterior however since it’s traditionally been an interiors tool.


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    Senior Member kamranmirza's Avatar
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    Yeah, we call it a 'Finishes Schedule'.

    And yes, mostly used on interiors projects.

    FYI, I know it's not relevant to the OP, but our Finishes Schedule has all the finishes in one table along with separate 'cut' sheets for each item, normally formatted from an excel file*; we have a macro that automatically converts the the main schedule into individual sheets for each finish along with picking up and pasting an image of each finish into each sheet from a pre-prepared folder.

    *This excel file and macro was created in our CAD days and our intention is to convert it into something that works out of Revit with the data stored in the Revit file.
    Last edited by kamranmirza; December 30th, 2018 at 06:46 PM. Reason: typos
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    Forum Addict tzframpton's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I do appreciate it. I'll start looking for this. I am interested in interiors as well but wanted to make sure I'm looking in the right direction consistently instead of wandering the desert, so to speak.

    -TZ

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    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    Practice varies from firm to firm. Many do a finish schedule biased to a room by room summary (one row per room). Others do a finish plan with tags that provide similar information. The schedule requires page turning for context where some what less page turning is necessary for finish plans.

    Exterior finishes tend to be explained on building elevations and keynotes of some sort. I don’t recall seeing a one stop shop location that adequately explains all the material choices involved.

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    Moderator cellophane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve_Stafford View Post
    I don’t recall seeing a one stop shop location that adequately explains all the material choices involved.
    I've seen it covered in specifications or a separate design guidelines document, but that is usually for bigger companies (i.e. Hotel brands that are identical across the country) more so than for smaller one-off projects.
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    We typically do finish plans now for interiors. Elevations should pick up most of the exterior finishes. We then list all the materials (along with manufacturer, colour, size etc) in one specification section. If something changes, then it's one spot to change info instead of chasing drawings and then chasing every possible specification section.
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    Mr. Revit OpEd
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    I left out specifications in my earlier reply because I was thinking in terms of a single source of truth and I've never seen finishes only mentioned/described in specifications. As soon as we note "refer to specifications' on a drawing it is no longer a single source. All the techniques I've ever seen require page turning and document switching to fully tell the story.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve_Stafford View Post
    I left out specifications in my earlier reply because I was thinking in terms of a single source of truth and I've never seen finishes only mentioned/described in specifications. As soon as we note "refer to specifications' on a drawing it is no longer a single source. All the techniques I've ever seen require page turning and document switching to fully tell the story.
    I completely glazed over your original response.

    Theoretically, specifications and drawings are one, as viewed by the contract... only physically separated because most building types will have a substantial sheet count for drawings and can't be folded up to be included in the book spec. At least, that's how I see the two work together. We never (or strongly try not to) use "refer to specifications"... it's redundant.

    Agreed that it's a combination of drawings and specifications to figure out what you need. Maybe residential homes could get away with everything in one package? No building I've ever worked on could have it all together.

    I joked with one of our spec writers, since we can nearly infinitely zoom into pdf's, that in the future we might see a 500 page spec on a drawing sheet But I'm sure, by then, we'll have figured out how to embed all the specification information we ever need into the model and won't need specifications and drawings.

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    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheinaranta View Post
    I completely glazed over your original response.

    Theoretically, specifications and drawings are one, as viewed by the contract... only physically separated because most building types will have a substantial sheet count for drawings and can't be folded up to be included in the book spec. At least, that's how I see the two work together. We never (or strongly try not to) use "refer to specifications"... it's redundant.

    Agreed that it's a combination of drawings and specifications to figure out what you need. Maybe residential homes could get away with everything in one package? No building I've ever worked on could have it all together.

    I joked with one of our spec writers, since we can nearly infinitely zoom into pdf's, that in the future we might see a 500 page spec on a drawing sheet But I'm sure, by then, we'll have figured out how to embed all the specification information we ever need into the model and won't need specifications and drawings.
    I have some Door Tags that are specifically meant to be viewed at in lik, 1200-2400% zoom, in Bluebeam, hahaha.

    Back to Tannars question, though: There is "whats in the drawings" and then there is "Whats in the model." I bring that up because- throughout the disparity of answers provided here (some do it in an AIO schedule, some do INT only, some do a Legend for EXT and a schedule for INT, and vice versa, some do keynotes, etc- the actual "Text that shows all of the information" is quite often not tied to anything intelligent in the model, im sorry to say.

    Our template (and others on the forum that i know) use a Live MTO in Revit, to call out actual Revit Materials, in the "Finish Legend." Just for every project out there started in a template like ours, there are 5 projects where the "Mark values" are filled in, in Revit, and the "Table of text" is nothing but strips of Text in a Drafting View or Legend.

    I only bring it up in case you are looking for a "single source of truth" that you can rely on in the *model* that you had better audit that model properly, because chances are it doesnt exist.

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