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Thread: BIM implementation - reasons

  1. #1
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    BIM implementation - reasons

    Hello all,

    If this thread doesn't fit in this conversation please remove it.

    I would like to ask you about BIM. Why you start to use BIM? Which were the reasons that lead you to turn towards from this direction?

    Thank you in advance!

  2. #2
    Forum Addict tzframpton's Avatar
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    As a mechanical designer, I first learned about ABS (Autodesk Building Systems) and asked my boss to get this package instead of vanilla AutoCAD when it was time to upgrade since it was almost exactly the same price and he agreed. I wanted it only because of the "cool 3D stuff" which is how I originally would state the phrase. I was in my early 20's.

    After tinkering, I wound up getting pretty good at it (thanks to a few individuals over at TheSwamp.org), and it helped I was in the field for several years to understand how things really truly were laid out during the construction process. Then the VP of estimating approached me out of nowhere and says "Hey have you ever heard of 'BIM' or something like that?" I told him I saw some topics online but didn't know what it was. He said he got awarded a job and we were required to provide 3D models and I told him yeah I think I can do that.

    Had the meeting with the GC who was showing examples and going over details and I though "Yeah I do this every day... shouldn't be hard" and wound up being a fun project. Then my company saw the benefits and BIM was born and I began learning about it and developing the process.

    All of this was circa 2005-2006 years. Revit officially became Revit MEP in the 2008 release (back in 2007) and that's when I picked up Revit for the first time (which I absolutely despised) and didn't give Revit a try again for another year or two, then it stuck.

    That's my story in a nutshell.

    -TZ

  3. #3
    Moderator snowyweston's Avatar
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    Job#3: Client requirement
    Job#5: BIM-Spin victims
    Job#6: 50/50 management led adoption
    Job#7: Client requirement

  4. #4
    Forum Addict elton williams's Avatar
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    Reason #643, not becoming extinct.

    all jokes aside, I started as 3D modeller using max and maya but come 2008 I found myself bored with cartoons and wanted some thing more, something real, and I found architecture. Maybe good timing or just plain luck but it felt like the world was ready for something a bit more real than bunch of lines on a bit of paper.
    Last edited by elton williams; May 8th, 2018 at 03:39 PM.
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    Forum Co-Founder Twiceroadsfool's Avatar
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    I had been working in Architecture in AutoCAD for a little while, and i got asked to join a firm that had to to use "new software that models the building and rips the drawings out of it," in 2005. It was Digital Project, v1 r2. After the entire team was assembled, we started training with the Digital project staff, who were there to train us on using the software.

    I remember the first day, when we were talking about how to model slabs. They showed us two different tools for modeling slabs, and when i asked which one we should use, the teacher shrugged and said *whichever you want, it doesnt matter.* This was the first insight i had, that this *thing* was going to need some sort of standardization. That very issue (how to model the slab) ended up being a train wreck, two days later.

    Anyway, for a number of reasons (none related to the technology used) the project only lasted a few months, and didnt go forward. But, after having seen how the Model to Document process worked, i knew i couldnt go back to working in AutoCAD for Architecture, and be happy. The economy in upstate New York was pretty dismal, when 25 of us were all laid off at the same time, i left town. Ended up working in a few Architecture firms using a couple of different platforms: First a Vectorworks firm, then an ArchiCAD firm, until i made my way back to upstate when i went to work in an architecture firm using Revit.

    There were no BIM managers, and there was no "training," but i know after about an hour of messing with it, that it was going to make the way i did work immensely better. That was January 3rd, 2006. I still have screen captures of the first Family i built, the first Project i worked on, and the first terrible Accurender rendering i did, trying to teach myself how the software worked.

    I was good, at AutoCAD. Still am, although i dont *draw* in it anymore, like i used to. But everything about working in a Modeled environment was just BETTER. So, i plowed away at Architecture projects in Revit, with very little training, and very little guidance besides some of the folks at the AUGI forums, emails, and the occasional Instant Message. And here we are. =)
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    I was in Corona, CA at the time working for a Developer for the Inland Empire Area. Was big into ACA (aka: ADT at the time in 2006) when I went to Microdesk to renew the License when they into'd me into Revit again. I played with Revit in 2004 as I left college to work in the real world of Arch after few years of Construction. Once I had real world experience in Arch combined with Construction it was no looking back. Then the economy in 2007 went belly up in Cali as I started doing early "vdc" coordination from the discipline CAD dwgs into Revit, but I was able to find my way back to Texas in Dallas to work for PAGE doing pure Arch again, which is where the CEO (aka: major stakeholder) is based out of, & did a small pet project of his & the rest as they say is history.

    This basically happened....
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58aSmM6ePoU

  7. #7
    Member kowen1208's Avatar
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    I started at a firm that had started using Revit on all their new ground-up projects. They handed me a tutorial manual my first day, told me to go through it, and let them know when I was ready to start working on a project. The manual was poorly written and skipped steps that made it very difficult or confusing to complete certain tasks (draw a wall using the Storefront wall type, then move the grids. Don't mind that we're not going to tell you they have to be unpinned first). It took a week to get through the book, and by the time I'd been working on projects for a week or two, I could see massive benefits to using Revit over AutoCAD.

    I used to be able to run circles around others in AutoCAD and was quite proficient in dynamic blocks and a little bit of lisp, but I'm so rusty at it now that I refuse to work in it. It still has some uses, but doing a project in it is out of the question.

    So why implement BIM? For me, because it's faster, easier to be accurate, easier to design thoroughly, and helps communicate the design to the client more clearly.

  8. #8
    Autodesk JeffH's Avatar
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    My professional use of AutoCAD started on AutoCAD13/14 (Office transitioned to 14 a couple of months after I started there.) When Architectural Desktop came about, our office started working with it pretty much at version 1. We had used Softdesk a bit before this so it was not totally foreign to use ADT. I became the office expert at using ADT and in fact helped our re-seller (CTC) develop presentations to sell ADT to other firms around town.

    Around 2001 our firm was going through an ownership transition and one of the new owners wanted to try and "cut ties" with Autodesk and started looking at other software alternatives. Revit at the time was monthly subscription so it was not a huge investment to take a chance on. We bought a seat and did a pilot project on it. It went well and the person using it wanted to keep working with it. So we kept on with it, but all projects we did with it had to be small because worksharing at that point actually did not even exist. I kept up my ADT skills for use on bigger projects, never really used Revit early on.

    At some point I was handed a small single family home project and was told it was a Revit project and sent home over the weekend to learn Revit and model a house project in it. So that was my first venture into Revit ~2003. I did a few other projects in it, Autodesk bought it, etc, etc, etc...

    In 2005 I was approached by Autodesk to come and work for them and have been here ever since.

    To answer the OP question more directly, my firm started down the BIM track with ADT (some might argue this is not BIM) and then transitioned over to Revit. We did it primarily to speed our drafting using objects (walls, doors, windows, "automatic" elevations) and make document coordination (view references & schedules) better and less prone to error. All of the other stuff that comes with BIM was not part of the reason we moved, but just came along for the ride after.
    Last edited by JeffH; May 10th, 2018 at 01:33 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member DavidLarson's Avatar
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    The firm I worked for had one primary client. Another firm they worked with convinced them that Revit was going to be cheaper in the long run. They told us that it was Revit or find a new client you have 3 months. We were trained (poorly) and then only 2 people touched Revit for the next 6 months. One was a control freak who ended up drinking on the job and the other was the BIM Manager who lied about his skills. The fustercluck that started in 2012 has improved a little but I'm no longer with them. Still it was better than using MicroSatan.
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  10. #10
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    After leaving university with an Electrical Engineering degree (which I hated) in the mid 90's I found my way into a job drafting electrical networks. On the odd occasion I got to do a bit of 3D which was awesome. The electrical side sucked but messing with CAD systems rocked. This was in a mix of Autocad and Microstation depending on which CAD manager was employed at the time and where his or her history and expertise lay.

    In the late 90's a got a gig looking after all the CAD on a famous and very geometrical challenging architectural project. It became clear architecture was where I wanted to be. This project wasn't going to work in 2D, so I busted my ass to figure out how to model this thing. Microstation was the tool of choice of this firm. Before long we were churning out drawings from the model (there was no way to draw this geometry and get it right) customizing databases for scheduling and starting behind the scenes code of what is now known today as computational design. It was pretty much Microstation, Bentley Architecture, GenerativeComponents, Rhino and Grasshopper for the naughties for me.

    Late naughties I started my own firm with a bunch of others where we started to look at other tools. It's a design focused firm. Revit became a big part of this evolution. All the documentation ended up in Revit because it's an excellent documentor. But everyone designs (models) in Rhino or AECOsim because they are the best architectural modelers on the market. Sketchup is banned because it's a dead end model.

    The one tool I have never tried is Archicad. Perhaps one day.

    So today, we are pushing a lot into the new AECOsim because it's just a one stop shop for everything (drawing, modelling, computational design, info properties, etc) and the new the new parametric modeling engine is just easy and in place in amongst other elements such as doors, walls, etc. What used to be blurred lines between Rhino and Revit is no longer. ..... well not entirely true. We have some very passionate Rhino and Grasshopper users.

    That's today but who knows where to next.

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