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Thread: Chiefarchitect versus revit for residential builds?

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    Chiefarchitect versus revit for residential builds?

    I am a user of chief architect and mostly do residential, I am highly interested to learn about revit.
    Is it worth switching to reviy in this residential department?

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    Senior Member Robin Deurloo's Avatar
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    Dunno, does Chief Architect do BIM, do you want to do BIM, are you asked to do BIM?
    Can you make anything you want/like with Chief Architect or can you just use the 3D stuff they provide?

    Just questions I have about the program and some that might help you with your question.

    Oh and remember that Revit alone is not that good with making those pretty pictures with all sorts of custom interior decoration I see on the Chief Architect website.
    Last edited by Robin Deurloo; September 24th, 2017 at 07:31 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by harambe View Post
    I am a user of chief architect and mostly do residential, I am highly interested to learn about revit.
    Is it worth switching to reviy in this residential department?
    rather a general question that is hard to answer in a Revit forum where most don't use CA. My question would be: why are you "highly interested to learn about Revit"? Is there something that CA doesn't do that you think can be accomplished with Revit? If your residential department is currently doing successful design output for clients, why switch to Revit?? Some years ago I switched from AutoCAD to Revit for my curtain wall design work but I had several very good reasons to do so which made it worth going through the very steep Revit learning curve. But then, if you just want to expand your knowledge of design software that's another issue and we here in RFO can help you with your Revit journey. Good luck!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robin Deurloo View Post
    Dunno, does Chief Architect do BIM, do you want to do BIM, are you asked to do BIM?
    Can you make anything you want/like with Chief Architect or can you just use the 3D stuff they provide?

    Just questions I have about the program and some that might help you with your question.

    Oh and remember that Revit alone is not that good with making those pretty pictures with all sorts of custom interior decoration I see on the Chief Architect website.
    Basically a pencil had never done the job, it is simply the tool to do what we can do and probably you have seen some one else using that tip of pencil to produce what you and I could have ever tried. It doesn't mean to ignore the quality of the tool, but to say the least, our skills in using any kind of tool is more important than how efficient the toos is designed to help us accomplish what we want to do.

    Having said that, several years back when AutoCAD proved to be much more efficient than the rapidograph and wowed us in creating automated lines that can get trimmed/extended in just a click, not to mention the eraser plus the undo capability. Yet some architects were and still are so relluctant to take advantage of that obvious benifits brought with man invented computers to increase our productivity.

    I am not going to critisize revit simply because of not creating floors/ceilings automatically after you define rooms by drawing walls! Not to mention that there are exception and should get handled separately, Be it an open bellow/no room definitions/ holes and exetra. Even in the old days, using pencil we automatically define floor boundaries based on the walls we draw, even after arasing the straight wall and replace it with curved ones using pencil, we never needed to draw floors separately except the use annotations plus adding lines and closed polygons when ever found necessary.

    Several years back, to me the said wall/floor logic was the reason behind not becoming a fan of revit. I could be wrong but all other floor tools in revit would just come in handy next to this default logic for defining floors. Is that solved in later versions? Though I am in agreement that, Revit is the best BIM application when it comes to what we can do with it, yet I simply doubt that it is the most efficent tool for every project level/type!!

    What surprised me recently was that, an architect friend of mine had just the same preconception as your's and had a mix of ideas between the capabilities of the premier version of chief architect with the DIY Products which had a very limited capability. He couldn't convince me if revit was the most efficient in terms of the time and effort it takes to accomplish the task, no matter how vast and capable revit's solid modeling tools are. Believe me that my friend architect had added chief architect premier version in his toolbox for residential builds.

    I just want you to know that, if you simply see how I and some others use chiefarchitect to do every thing we want, you could just think that it is the best software in the industry!! Yet I can assure you, there are some areas that chief lacks and has not done all it coulld to automate what computers could do the best for us.

    I am still interested to learn more about REVIT and other BIM applications sir.
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    Senior Member Robin Deurloo's Avatar
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    You might have understood me wrong there, not saying Revit is better then CA for the stuff you are doing. If it works for you it is good. I was just asking my questions to figure out why you had an interest in Revit and I really don't know anything about CA.

    So, tell me (us) why are you highly interested to learn about Revit, what makes you believe it could be better for doing the jobs you do then CA?

    And about your story about having floors and ceilings added automatically when adding walls, that would bug the hell out of me most of the time. What if my rooms don't have ceilings (most of the rooms I model don't have a ceiling), what if the floor is below multiple rooms? And in the old days, as you say, when we were drawing with pencils we DID have to draw the floors separately, but we did that in the sections, elevations and details, these days (with Revit or ArchiCAD or any other program) you model them and get them in your sections, elevations and detail 'for free' and consistent along all of them even if you change one.
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    Without a full understanding of the type of residential work you do, this is more difficult to answer. As a past user of CA for residential work, and a current user of Revit for primarily commercial work, I would suggest sticking with CA. Revit does offer a significant potential for customization, however I do not see where this would be all that beneficial to your line of work. As others have mentioned the learning curve can be quite high.
    JT

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robin Deurloo View Post
    You might have understood me wrong there, not saying Revit is better then CA for the stuff you are doing. If it works for you it is good. I was just asking my questions to figure out why you had an interest in Revit and I really don't know anything about CA.

    So, tell me (us) why are you highly interested to learn about Revit, what makes you believe it could be better for doing the jobs you do then CA?

    And about your story about having floors and ceilings added automatically when adding walls, that would bug the hell out of me most of the time. What if my rooms don't have ceilings (most of the rooms I model don't have a ceiling), what if the floor is below multiple rooms? And in the old days, as you say, when we were drawing with pencils we DID have to draw the floors separately, but we did that in the sections, elevations and details, these days (with Revit or ArchiCAD or any other program) you model them and get them in your sections, elevations and detail 'for free' and consistent along all of them even if you change one.
    Thanks for the clarification and follow up.
    Why I am interested? Revit is very interesting software. Isn't it?
    Seems to be more powerful than CA as I can see a lot buildings with a very very complex shapes. What I was also wondering is how it does what chief can do for me in terms of the time and effort it takes. And thanks for answering the issue I have raised about automation wall/ floor modeling workflow. It works for me in chief and I wish there is a mode/setting similar to chief's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonojnr View Post
    Without a full understanding of the type of residential work you do, this is more difficult to answer. As a past user of CA for residential work, and a current user of Revit for primarily commercial work, I would suggest sticking with CA. Revit does offer a significant potential for customization, however I do not see where this would be all that beneficial to your line of work. As others have mentioned the learning curve can be quite high.
    JT

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
    Thanks for the feedback.

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    The Moderator with No Imagination MPwuzhere's Avatar
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    Sections actually work in Revit vs Chief Architect. You don't have to explode elevations to make them look right.

    The only thing that I believe CA has over Revit is its cabinet libraries.

    But I worked for a residential contractor for about 3 months using CA every day. I think it is more like ArchiCAD.
    Last edited by MPwuzhere; September 26th, 2017 at 06:41 PM.

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    Senior Member Robin Deurloo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harambe View Post
    Thanks for the clarification and follow up.
    Why I am interested? Revit is very interesting software. Isn't it?
    Seems to be more powerful than CA as I can see a lot buildings with a very very complex shapes. What I was also wondering is how it does what chief can do for me in terms of the time and effort it takes. And thanks for answering the issue I have raised about automation wall/ floor modeling workflow. It works for me in chief and I wish there is a mode/setting similar to chief's.

    No problem, but my origional questions stand "does Chief Architect do BIM, do you want to do BIM, are you asked to do BIM?"

    I can imagine (and I am doing) BIM for residential projects, even single homes. Where the contractor makes a Revit model and I model the MEP part (not a MEP guy, but I can handle single homes) and more parties could get involved. And that is the main reason I think for you to move from CA to Revit, if that is something you want or are asked to do. If CA can do an ifc export with data, then that point might not be valid, but again I have no clue about CA.

    Revit takes some practice, good content and good template for a project to work well. You can start with stuff you get from a re-seller of find on the web, but you will find that you will be making your own stuff pretty soon because the stuff from the web is not exactly what you want or just sucks, which does require a bit more revit know-how then just making a model from existing content, but once the content is there, you can do a house in a few days.
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