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    BIM Question to ponder

    I am curious what other people in Revit community think about this question.

    Would using 2D components, detail and model, be considered BIM?

    My initial thought would be no, but you would be hard pressed to put a set together without them. Even Autodesk recommends not to over modeling in order to help control the file size of the project.

    #2
    Hi,
    yes they are BIM.
    Because they have informations and contain data. They are linked with the data base.
    Maybe it is cheap BIM, cause the model is not in 3D, but it is just because computers and softwares are still not at this time efficient enough to allow user to model every part of a model.
    Be patient, it should come! (are you listening Factory ? )
    Julien
    "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
    P. DAC
    Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

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      #3
      Welcome to the forum djnelson.

      The way I see it: If you model a base cabinet as just a regular box, "draw" the door and handle with detail lines and add information about the cabinet manufacturer (or whatever information) - Then the base cabinet will be BIM, and the detail lines would be part of representing that that BIM object, but they would not be BIM on their own... :beer:
      Klaus Munkholm
      "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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        #4
        Sure I can see the argument for 2D model components where you manually input or attach the information you want to schedule, but 2d detail components aren't even schedule able. I can't even find out a count of how many I have used in a drawing set.
        Last edited by djnelson75; March 16, 2011, 10:34 PM.

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          #5
          Nor would you want to, since they dont populate through the entire model. IE: I dont put in a detail component for blocking, in every location blocking happens. But i put that detail component IN the model, and that model is part of the PROCESS, and that process is what BIM is. BIM isnt any one object, any one model, any one method. Depending on how far you push it, or how little you push it, the BIM process varies wildly.

          Generally i discover questions like this are part of a farther reaching debate somewhere in a company, is that the case? Without extremely expensive hardware and a ridiculous budget, you wont get a project out without 2D components, i assure you. Not only that, but modeling EVERYTHING in 3D is not value adding.
          Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
          @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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            #6
            Actually the reason I asked the question was I read an article on a vectorworks user who was pondering the meaning to BIM. In his workflow he seldom uses the model, but uses symbols (basically components in Revit), the ability to attach data to them and the ability to schedule them to create this construction set. I got me thinking if did 90% of putting the drawing set together with schedule able 2d model components would you call that BIM. I thought the whole idea of the "M" in BIM is to create a model of the building. Not to create smart 2D drawings.

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              #7
              In my opinion the "B" and the "I" are more important than the "M" of BIM. BIM means to me, storing and working with all the data that makes a building, in the most efficient way. A 3d model helps with that, but a excel sheet too, or 2d detail that explains your design intent.

              You don't want to model every shrew in 3d, when a 2d symbol is enough.
              Sander Obdeijn
              Support Engineer
              ITANNEX [Autodesk Gold Partner]

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                #8
                Originally posted by sander.obdeijn View Post
                In my opinion the "B" and the "I" are more important than the "M" of BIM. BIM means to me, storing and working with all the data that makes a building, in the most efficient way. A 3d model helps with that, but a excel sheet too, or 2d detail that explains your design intent.

                You don't want to model every shrew in 3d, when a 2d symbol is enough.
                This to me sounds like you are only considering a single party documenting a project. (correct me if I am wrong)

                Most projects will have a least two parties(often many more) contributing towards a project, for BIM to truly work successfully the co ordination of the modelling component is the first step in my opinion, the information will then follow if the modeling is co ordinated. Or are you considering this aspect the "B"?

                2d annotation in my opinion is definitely part of the BIM process

                From a structural aspect it is possible to model absolutely everything, and I have seen it done. But to what benefit is always the question asked.
                Revit BLOGGAGE

                http://www.revic.org.au

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                  #9
                  I partly agree. One of the benefits of a model is clash detection, and if there is hardly a model to clash detect against. What's the point.

                  If for instance if used strictly 2d elements for windows, doors, columns, and framing. The drawings would look good. I could schedule them, get quantities and sizes, but the model would seriously be lacking. This is an extreme example, but could be done in Revit.

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                    #10
                    I don't think that using JUST 2D components is BIM. 2D components alone are not BIM just as much as a lone 3DS MAX model (or something similar) is not BIM. There are three letters in the acronym and if you're missing one of them you don't have it.
                    Last edited by Chadwick17; March 17, 2011, 03:20 PM. Reason: clarification
                    Chad Koscinski | Architect

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