Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Revit and Add Alternates

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Revit and Add Alternates

    Currently working on a project where we have add alternates for location/amount of storefront in the lobby. Would you guys say that design options is the best way to go to represent something like this? That way, if the alternate is selected I can accept that design option in the model and move forward. I know there has been a lot of talk about the 'correct' use of design options in the Revit model...
    Chad Koscinski | Architect

    #2
    Its a perfect use of Design Options, and you can EITHER accept a prmiary OR you can keep both through the duration of CA. It was meant for that, and it works fine if used properly. Ive placed the add/alt views on drawings right next to each other and run straight through the entire project with them.
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

    Comment


      #3
      In the option set, would you then have the base bid as option 1 (primary) and the add alternate as option 2?

      May seem like a simple question - just trying to talk through it so the process makes sense to me.
      Chad Koscinski | Architect

      Comment


        #4
        Whichever one you are going to show in more drawings, i would set as Primary. Yep!
        Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
        @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

        Comment


          #5
          Great! This seems to be working out nicely. Design options seem to be running a lot more fluid than I once remember... have those buttons/menus at the bottom of the screen always been there for design options? Or is that something new? For some reason I remember having to open the dialog box, set primary, etc. every time I wanted to edit an option before...
          Chad Koscinski | Architect

          Comment


            #6
            One thing to keep in mind is that a Revit Option Set should be a pretty discreet thing specially. Architecturally you may think of Add Alt #1 as a variation on the entry, and a variation on the board room, and a variation on the stairs. Maybe there is some design motif used in all three so the Alt is all three or none. From a Revit standpoint I would have three Option Sets; Entry, Board Room and Stair. Each Option Set then has an Add Alt #1 Option. Too often I have seen a single option set, and stuff spread all around the model in a single option. Usually ends up a painful process of pulling it all apart into the smaller option sets at some point.

            And remember the "Empty Option" pattern. Sometimes "Base Bid" is the main model, and all the alternates are additional stuff. In which case you have a Primary Design Option, probably called Base Bid, that actually contains nothing at all.

            The same pattern works for things like using DOs for furniture layouts. The empty one applies to the CD set, and the various furniture layouts get their own DO and presentation views.

            Gordon
            Last edited by Gordon Price; March 9, 2011, 05:30 PM.
            Pragmatic Praxis

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks Gordon. I'm curious about the 'Empty Option'.

              For example, in this project I have the existing building. The base bid is to replace the existing storefront in the lobby. The add alternate is to actually make the lobby 4' larger. I have an Option Set called 'Lobby Storefront' and within that set there is Base Bid (the replacement of the storefront) and Add Alt #1 (the new storefront 4' to the north). The Base Bid option is the primary so that this option shows up in all new construction views by default.

              Does that seem correct? Is what I have defined as the Base Bid option similar to what you are calling the 'Empty Option' (even though it really isn't empty)? Want to make sure I'm not going to cause more trouble moving through CDs...
              Chad Koscinski | Architect

              Comment


                #8
                That sounds like you have it right. The cleanups where the Add Alt option meets the main model can be an issue, sometimes you end up with some walls that are not "architecturally" part of the Add Alt in the Design Option just to make the graphics look right. But you have the gist of it.

                The "empty option" is for something like an open office area as a base bid, and perimeter closed offices as the add alt. The shell is main model. Base bid is an "empty option", and the Add Alt Option contains the perimeter offices. So like you say, the whole set shows Base Bid automatically. In the context of the perimeter offices Base Bid means "build nothing", but Revit needs an actual "thing" that is "nothing". The first time you do it it seems really weird, just remember that the computer is very literal. The next time you need it it makes total sense.

                Gordon
                Pragmatic Praxis

                Comment


                  #9
                  That makes sense. I appreciate you taking the time to explain how it works - thanks for that.
                  Chad Koscinski | Architect

                  Comment


                    #10
                    You can also use Design Options to do a lot of "Yes or no" things, which i think is what Gordon means by empty...

                    http://malleristicrevitation.blogspo...and-revit.html
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X