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    Multiple drawing sets

    Preface: I work in NYC where the department of buildings is a giant PITA and therefore to get around some of their problems and get work started quickly (everyone wants construction started yesterday and completed today) we create filing sets which are different from our construction sets. We also create multiple filing sets and break the work up into work that can be filed quickly (no change in occupancy) and work that could be more difficult to get approved (change in occupancy).

    We are finding that there is no easy way to create multiple drawing sets within one Revit file. Yes, we can create multiple views and filter elements we want to hide, but then Revit will not allow you to have multiple sheets of the same name.

    Has anyone ever come across this situation? How do you go about handling it? Ideally we'd like to keep everything in the same file (we've tried creating one project for filing set, but that just ends up with duplicate work being created if anything is changed).

    Conclusion: Revit is not as nimble when it comes to creating multiple drawing sets.

    #2
    replying so I can find this later. I might need the same advice later this week.
    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


    chad
    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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      #3
      One work around you might want to try to get around the unique sheet number "limitation" (it's actually quite a valid functionality when you think about it) would be to create a duplicate of your titleblock family and edit the drawing number field to read things a little differently...

      Example :

      Titleblock "A"
      Document Number = <Field1>-<Field2>-<Sheet Number>
      i.e.
      A-00-001 = <A>-<00>-<001>
      A-00-002 = <A>-<00>-<002>
      A-00-003 = <A>-<00>-<003>

      Titleblock "B"
      Document Number = <Field1>-<Sheet Number>
      i.e.
      A-00-001 = <A>-<00-001>
      A-00-002 = <A>-<00-002>
      A-00-003 = <A>-<00-003>

      Sure it's a dirty trick - but what you're doing is hardly "clean" (trying to beat a system that I imagine has been fairly robustly designed so that you can get things done "quicker" rather than "correctly") but at least it does offer some means to differentiate your "different" sheet sets through project browser organisation sort/filters.

      Of course, this is all dependant on your numbering system and/or the affect it'll have on how/what your callout/section/elevation heads reference.

      HTH


      EDIT
      One last, late night thought, you mention you've tried using another project, but not how, so here's a question. You didn't duplicate the model also did you? Why not simply a blank host model, with the original (singular) model linked in, and views setup there to look at it, employing vg settings - and most probably filters to suit the difference in document requirements (you may need to add a "for filing documentation" parameter to everything in the model if it's actual geometry you're controlling the visibility of) and placed on identically named sheets there. That could work as well.



      But either way, I'd hate to be your document controller!
      Last edited by snowyweston; May 15, 2012, 11:44 PM.

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        #4
        What about just adjusting your numbering, similar to snowy's response:

        A100
        A1.00 (note the decimal) They are different sheets according to Revit since the only thing it looks at is the sheet number when considering duplicates.

        if you go the route snowy suggests - you can concatenate values using one of the Whitefeet Add-ins into a single parameter if you want.
        Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


        chad
        BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

        Comment


          #5
          We are finding that the easiest way to deal with this is to save the filing set as a separate Revit model. There can be some annoyance and duplication of work when it comes to amending the filing set, but it is much less of a headache when trying to deal with keeping everything together in one file.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by stl4310 View Post
            We are finding that the easiest way to deal with this is to save the filing set as a separate Revit model. There can be some annoyance and duplication of work when it comes to amending the filing set, but it is much less of a headache when trying to deal with keeping everything together in one file.
            that make me shudder!
            I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
              that make me shudder!
              Yes, but fortunately filing sets are very light sets, not requiring RCPs, details, interior elevations or schedules. So we can just focus on getting the plans and elevations to look right.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by stl4310 View Post
                Yes, but fortunately filing sets are very light sets, not requiring RCPs, details, interior elevations or schedules. So we can just focus on getting the plans and elevations to look right.
                well, OK, then I'm downgraded to a shiver then
                I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

                Comment


                  #9
                  For projects in our office which have different phases or buildings, we use a prefix before the sheet number.

                  For example, the project contains constructions documents for the building shell, then three separate tenant space phases (different contracts, different schedules). In this case, the overall first floor plan would be named as such:

                  Shell: A-101
                  Tenant Phase 1: 10-A-101
                  Tenant Phase 2: 20-A-101
                  Tenant Phase 3: 30-A-101

                  Also, we have an additional parameter in our sheet files for project number, which we use for filtering the sheets for indexing.

                  Don't know if it helps, but thought I'd share.
                  Tim Collier
                  CAD/IT Support
                  Cromwell Architects Engineers
                  Little Rock, Arkansas

                  Comment


                    #10
                    We have a project with 3 different phases (4 with exisitng) and requires 3 separate sets of drawings.

                    We created a "Facility" Revit model that is linked into 3 separate Revit files to create the documents. (not really a true FM but for this process, we needed a name for the master model)

                    -Model in the "facility" model
                    -Input data into the facility model
                    -map the phasing for all files to eliminate confusion
                    -tag, annotate, document in the 3 separate "paper" sets
                    -be oragnized with phases, shared parameters, & with the people working on the project
                    -Utilize view templates, filters & transfer project stds
                    -Best to start all files with the same fine tuned template

                    ...and it all works.

                    BTW: I like the fact that you can only have one A-111 sheet in a project. Not having that would mess up Revit's powerful view referencing feature
                    01010010011001010111011001101001011101000010000001 10100101110011001000000110010001100101011000010110 0100

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