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    Store rebar nets inside

    Here´s a good reason to store rebar nets inside - Pretty sure that it won´t reinforce anything but the ice in the current state :laugh:
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    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

    #2
    COOL! :laugh:
    Martijn de Riet
    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
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    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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      #3
      Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
      Here´s a good reason to store rebar nets inside - Pretty sure that it won´t reinforce anything but the ice in the current state :laugh:
      I wonder if they have thought of doing things like this on pourpose...there are massive ammouts of heat released from concrete when it is poured...be interested to see if this type of set-up would do anything with that heat from the inside...especially on larger pours such as dams.

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        #4
        Originally posted by gdoherty0102 View Post
        I wonder if they have thought of doing things like this on pourpose...there are massive ammouts of heat released from concrete when it is poured...be interested to see if this type of set-up would do anything with that heat from the inside...especially on larger pours such as dams.
        just out of curiosity how does concrete release "massive amounts of heat" when it is poured?
        I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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          #5
          It´s a chemical reaction
          Klaus Munkholm
          "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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            #6
            Right...the chemical reaction between the cement and water puts heat off. This is not typically and issue, but on larger pours like they had on the Hoover (then Boulder) Dam that was a major consideration on how they would deal with the massive ammounts of heat dispursed.

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              #7
              Yep, I just read that they figured if they just poured the damn as one huge pour, it would take 125 years to cure. lol

              So what did they do? They did it in squares. Inside of each of these "squares" they put metal piping that would allow river water, then refrigerated water to run through the center of the pour and disperse the heat. When they were done, the filled the pipes with grout.

              Pretty slick, considering it was done in the 1930's. lol
              Dan

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                #8
                Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
                It´s a chemical reaction
                when you mix something with something else it creates a chemical reaction. That doesn't mean that it produces heat. I can see where the curing process might produce heat but I've been standing in the middle of some pretty large floor slab pours and they didn't warm me up a bit
                I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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                  #9
                  Now...I may be a little off on this, but I don't beleive so. Chemicial reactions cause a change in energy, this energy is usually dissipated as heat.

                  A large floor slab has a large area to dissipate the heat across, so could be un-noticable in one area.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by gdoherty0102 View Post
                    Now...I may be a little off on this, but I don't beleive so. Chemicial reactions cause a change in energy, this energy is usually dissipated as heat.

                    A large floor slab has a large area to dissipate the heat across, so could be un-noticable in one area.
                    again, I was just curious and not trying to be argumentative. I worked as a concrete finisher for 4 years while in school and I never noticed that concrete would get warm while it was curing. Probably as you say, due to the small quantity involved. And, my major was not Chemistry obviously
                    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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