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    Sample Projects and Templates

    Hi all,

    I posted this on another forum but I thought I would join the community here, for maximum knowledge acquisition!

    I work for a ~20 person architectural firm that, currently, does a lot of condominium projects. I have previously worked for an office that did similar work using ArchiCAD, and it worked pretty well. I'm now trying to set up this office for Revit (ArchiCAD's support and user base just aren't as good). Being new to the world of Revit, though, I'm pretty lost.

    What I'm wondering is if any has (or knows where to find) sample projects so that I could see how offices utilize the software. I tried starting a few projects from the ground up, and would like to set up an office template, but there are just too many question marks floating around on best practices for doing things. I learned all about parameters for organizing drawings, for example, but I'm wondering if there are better ways. I worked in one office that used revit, but it was on such a small scale that I don't think it applies. If anyone has any recommendations for families to get started with (for windows, doors, elevators, garage doors, structural elements, etc) I would love to hear it! Hopefully as I develop my template I can put together a ZIP file for others in my situation to use... a "master" set of families, as it were, for the most basic/essential building components.

    Anyway, thanks for your time and I look forward to any and all responses!

    #2
    http://www.revitforum.org/architectu...html#post46102
    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


    chad
    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

    Comment


      #3
      Here's a thread with great links for Revit newbies. There's a link there to an excellent thread on the how to's of building a template, among other things.

      EDIT:

      Cellophane beat me to it! It took me too long to find the damn thread. :laugh:
      Dan

      Comment


        #4
        it's easy when I started the thread to find it.

        it's in my signature now. :bb:
        Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


        chad
        BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

        Comment


          #5
          Except your link is broken. =\
          Adam Hutchinson
          Engineer in Training
          Integrus Architecture, P.S.

          Comment


            #6
            whack!

            let me see what I can do about that.
            Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


            chad
            BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by dzatto View Post
              Here's a thread with great links for Revit newbies. There's a link there to an excellent thread on the how to's of building a template, among other things.

              EDIT:

              Cellophane beat me to it! It took me too long to find the damn thread. :laugh:
              Yeah, that's definitely a great thread - and the Revit Template one is epic! The only thing that all the posts lack, though, is some sort of methodology for establishing a workflow. For example, the thread about working views/print views is great, but doesn't give me any hint as to how to make the "idea" work other than to say that parameters will help browser organization. Maybe it's just a quirk of how I learn - I like to get my hands dirty in a working system and see how it works (and why it works) and glean everything I can from it, rather than suffering my way through the trial and error of experimenting with different strategies to see what works.

              Browser organization is a major one for this - and to be honest I like ArchiCAD's system quite a lot. You have your "project data" which is just the model which you navigate by storey, and then you have your views which apply a scale, layer setting and print style to the model (and you create groups/subgroups like a directory structure and sort and organize accordingly). So you essentially have a working area that you navigate like a building, and then you have a drawing set that you derive from that building. It's really nice to work on layers rather than create a bunch of views, but maybe I'm still too used to working in AutoCAD

              In any event, I'm looking forward to getting involved in the forums if our office moves forward with Revit! I'll try to discover what I can, in the meantime, and I'll be sure to share what I can.

              Comment


                #8
                IMO - workflow just comes from using the software. I can show you how I do it but it might not make any sense to you. Layers are evil. Run away from them. If you have a subscription you can go look through all the old AU presentations. There are some real gems on project management and workflow type issues.
                Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                chad
                BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by cellophane View Post
                  IMO - workflow just comes from using the software. I can show you how I do it but it might not make any sense to you. Layers are evil. Run away from them. If you have a subscription you can go look through all the old AU presentations. There are some real gems on project management and workflow type issues.
                  Ah, that's a good idea! know if I can watch *any* presentations? I think our subscription is for vanilla autocad, if we have one... :S

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I agree with Cellophane. It really is a figure it out as you go. If you're in need of something specific, just ask if you can't find it first.

                    BTW, still broken Cellophane.
                    Adam Hutchinson
                    Engineer in Training
                    Integrus Architecture, P.S.

                    Comment

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