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Colour plan that shows floor finishes?

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    Colour plan that shows floor finishes?

    I need to produce a coloured plan that shows the floor finishes. The Room Tag Identity Data has the floor finish description added, so all I need is to be able to produce a coloured plan that has Floor finish #1 in yellow, floor finish #2 in green etc.

    If it's done via Area Plans I've spent most of ths morning and have missed the answer. Any guidance please?

    #2
    You can do this with a Color Scheme.
    Similar to an Area plan, but you've already got everything there you need.
    Duplicate your floor plan View (NOT as Dependent)
    Make sure that Color Fill is turned on in Visibilty/Graphics under the Room category.
    On the Ribbon's Home Tab, click on the down-arrow under Room & Area, then select Color Schemes.
    Make a new Color Scheme, and select your Floor Finish parameter from the Color drop down.
    One more thing. Back in the new View's Properties, change Color Scheme to the name of the Scheme you just created.

    One caveat. This will color the entire Room with one color. This won't do what you want if you have two Finishes in the same Room.

    Welcome to Revit!
    Dave Plumb
    BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

    CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

    Comment


      #3
      Just as Dave suggests.

      BUT

      as Dave also suggests, for more "involved" floor finishes plans, you're going to need to go the step beyond using the room <floor finish> parameter and set to modelling the floor finishes themselves. This is worth bearing in mind sooner rather than later, for "high level" strategy/first-pass design-intent work, colour schemes in plans work just fine - but have a limited shelf life - whereas modelling the floors proper, although a bit of extra modelling work, reward (and keep rewarding) further down the line.

      You need only remember moving from one to the other "breaks" the functionality of the room object's <finish> parameters somewhat since the information becomes modelled, rather than parametric, (creating a potential inconsistency) - and of course you then still have to choose how you represent the differences in the floor elements (tags, patterns for materials, pattern overrides using filters, or a combination of all)

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by DaveP View Post
        You can do this with a Color Scheme.....
        Excellent. Just what I need for the moment. I'm sure I'll move onto Snowyweston's suggestion once we move beyond this stage.

        Originally posted by DaveP View Post
        Welcome to Revit!
        Oh dear, was this sooooo basic? Been using Revit since 6.1 [lowers head in shame] :hide:

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          #5
          Originally posted by Damo View Post
          Oh dear, was this sooooo basic? Been using Revit since 6.1 [lowers head in shame] :hide:
          No, not at all. I guess I should have said "Welcome to RFO". I was just looking at your post count of 4.
          Although, you probably shouldn't go outside so much. You should stay in and poke around your Revit Ribbon more.
          Dave Plumb
          BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

          CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

          Comment


            #6
            The quick (albeit 'incorrect') way to do it is to use ceilings.

            Revit Scratchpad: Modelling Floor Finishes–The FAST way!
            Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


            chad
            BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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              #7
              I'm guessing you don't model your floor finishes?
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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                #8
                me?

                I do. In a pinch I'll use ceilings for quick presentation stuff and fix it later. I've been using the WorkFlow add-in from Revolution Design and it works great for finish floors.
                Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                chad
                BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I know some may disagree with this method, but here goes:

                  1. Create Finish Floor, on top of "structural floor". Could be an entire Floor Plate, or certain main spaces ( Lobby,etc. ) or even individual Rooms.
                  2. Create Parts and Divide,with geometric layouts/patterns per design requirements.
                  3. Apply various Materials to Divided Areas
                  4. Create Views for Floor Pattern Plan(s), place on Sheets
                  5. Create Parts Schedule by Material; place Schedule on Sheet with Floor Pattern Plans.

                  Use Shaded, Consistent Colors, or Realistic View with or without shadows, depending on the graphic technique needed to show colors/materials/textures, etc.

                  I have never seen a building in 30 years where ALL rooms had only a single floor material, so the Color Scheme method really doesn't work well unless this is the case, which would be very unusual. Just my 2 c worth.
                  Last edited by cliff collins; February 29, 2012, 08:23 PM.
                  Cliff B. Collins
                  Registered Architect
                  The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
                  Autodesk Expert Elite

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