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    Detail Component Creation from CAD

    I'm starting on sections and details for a hotel and need to detail the window / ptac assembly. The windows are alum. storefront so there are a variety of pieces in each assembly. I have CAD details and can import them into a component but I'm not sure if I should create the entire assembly as one component or draw each piece and assemble it, either as nested unit that I can insert into my section or in the model and then group.

    The attached image is from the prototype drawing.
    Attached Files
    Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


    chad
    BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

    #2
    Originally posted by cellophane View Post
    I'm starting on sections and details for a hotel and need to detail the window / ptac assembly. The windows are alum. storefront so there are a variety of pieces in each assembly. I have CAD details and can import them into a component but I'm not sure if I should create the entire assembly as one component or draw each piece and assemble it, either as nested unit that I can insert into my section or in the model and then group.

    The attached image is from the prototype drawing.
    the only reason that I could see that you should have to create all of the individual window parts and then group them in the project is if you have a lot of details that have varying parts in them. Normally in a hotel project like in your section the details for sections and plan views will be very typical. If that's the case I'd include all of the parts in the DC and not have to bother with grouping them in the project.
    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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      #3
      Create a DC for each component, and then assemble those in Revit.

      And instead of even thinking about importing, linking etc. (Strongly assuming you don't need the same LOD as Dave), follow these few and simple steps, and you'll have native Revit DC's in no time.
      1. Open a new blank DC from the DC template.
      2. Import the DWG
      3. Explode the DWG
      4. Change all the lines, hatches etc. to Revit lines and Revit Patterns (Make sure you get EVERYTHING)
      5. Select all the new Revit content, and copy to clipboard.
      6. Open a new blank DC from the DC template.
      7. Paste the Revit content. (Lines and Patterns, etc.)


      Now, if you followed those few steps carefully, you have a NATIVE Revit DC, which you can use in this project, and the next, and the next... without worrying about getting drags and dwg leftovers in your projects. :beer:
      Klaus Munkholm
      "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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        #4
        Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
        (Strongly assuming you don't need the same LOD as Dave)
        I'm getting a very bad LOD reputation around here

        I still don't understand why each and every individual window framing part would have to be componentized (my new word) and then regrouped together for a project and situation like the OP has. He's most probably going to have ONE window head detail, ONE window sill detail, and ONE window jamb detail. If there are different details I would bet that all or most all of the window components would be different in those cases. Sometimes simple is better maybe?
        I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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          #5
          Simple is always better, but IMO it would be a mistake not to plan ahead too... If every part gets componentized (Great word BTW) as you need them, each future project will be just a little faster to finish. So look at it as an investment in the future, and not a complicated time consuming thing to do (It really takes no time, once you get the hang of the workflow)
          Klaus Munkholm
          "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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            #6
            We used the workflow Munk described, but took it another level further... And then used the nesting and splitting approach that i explained to Dave in another thread, about making Mullions. All in all, the detail component for a Double Hung window is stretchable, with three pull tabs (center, top, and bottom), and ALL of the little nuts and bolts flex with it. But again, even the size of the window is dictated by the model. This typically only gets used for large scale details that happen in non-dimensionally critical typical details, etc.

            Truth be told, its fairly pointless, since the window models are very accurate, but even our window content doesnt have THAT much detail in it. It took several hours to build that window DC, but it works for every single DH window we will ever do now. Plus once the DC for the DH was done, the others were way faster.

            EDIT: Here is a (really???) video of it finished. At one point in the video i went to turn on Thick Lines, but the joke was on me: This viewport was at 1/8", and the camtasia toolbar was on top of it. Sorry! LOL

            WindowDC - aaronmaller's library

            EDIT EDIT: The word quick with an -ie on the end of it is curse filtered? What the heck?? What kinda low rent job is this? LOL
            Last edited by Twiceroadsfool; February 1, 2012, 12:58 AM.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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              #7
              I ended up tracing the various parts rather than exploding. Then nesting the parts into a single window unit that I added into my section. Overall it was easy to do unless I need to update one of the nested components and then I have to open each DC it is nested into and load family... I'm sure I'm doing something wrong

              As of right now we will have 2 of each detail (CMU / Wood Stud) but it won't be too hard to adjust. If the client ever makes up their mind on exterior finishes I might have more...

              Aaron - you wouldn't have a window family you could share do you? When you say
              the window models are very accurate, but even our window content doesnt have THAT much detail in it.
              what LOD do your windows have? I know the OOTB windows are just a rectangle extrusion and are fine for generic modeling but lacking detail. In the long run I'd like to make windows that have the broad scale details built in and only need to worry about the enlarged details but we are no where close to that since the BIM manager is also a project manager and draftsman and IT and everything else that needs done... (that would be me) and I don't have time to get it all done
              Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


              chad
              BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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                #8
                I dont have any windows i can post, unfortunately. But they have way more detail than the OOTB ones. Voids for openings so the exterior opening and interior opening can be different sizes, the Trim is all a Shared Nested Face Based Families (which causes trouble on curved walls), and the Panels in the windows are shared and nested too, although thats more for modeling expediency, than anything else.

                And if it makes you feel better, that entire window library was built on a saturday... While i needed them on a project.
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                  I dont have any windows i can post, unfortunately. But they have way more detail than the OOTB ones. Voids for openings so the exterior opening and interior opening can be different sizes, the Trim is all a Shared Nested Face Based Families (which causes trouble on curved walls), and the Panels in the windows are shared and nested too, although thats more for modeling expediency, than anything else.

                  And if it makes you feel better, that entire window library was built on a saturday... While i needed them on a project.
                  Experience goes a long ways

                  is your detail component nested in the window or do you add it seperately?

                  It would probably take me an entire saturday to build one window. I haven't quite gotten my head around all this nesting components jazz. Conceptually I get it but haven't quite mastered the implementation.
                  Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                  chad
                  BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Its not nested in the window family, because with the nested panels and trim, the DC needed might change (To sdwap between a DH, Fixed, Awning, Casement, etc, you swap a parameter, not an actual family). But, we only typically use the DC at head/jamb scale details, as i said. Its not something we need at building sections or wall sections.

                    Building them isnt that bad if you sketch out a framework. Mine was on a starbucks napkin (I keep my wacky family diagrams. You should see a picture of my cubicle...) The first window- mind you, took the majority of the hours. After that its a few save-as's, and a few parameter changes.

                    Spend a weekend playing with nesting and sharing. It changes everything: detail components, library stuff, scheduling stuff. Single most powerful thing in content building.
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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