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    Viewrange ?

    Hello.

    What does Revit do with objects between the cutplane and the top plane? Thanks.
    - Sputnik

    #2
    Hi Sputnik,
    Welcome to the forum.

    Any object which is entirely above the cut plane will not be visible in that view.
    Create a Plan Region from the View tab and set the cut plane to the centre of this object and it will become visible.
    Ian Kidston
    http://allextensions.com.au

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      #3
      Thank you Ian.

      I got an image from a internet blog, that explains most of this but i´m still not sure why there is a TOP setting then.
      What is the area between cutplane and top used for ? Nothing ?
      Thank you for helping me
      Attached Files
      - Sputnik

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        #4
        It may well be used for other functions as well, but the primary range is used in the calculation of room volumes.

        Cheers,
        Ian Kidston
        http://allextensions.com.au

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          #5
          Well, lets assume that you have a double height atrium and you have an element that is above the top plane and the cut plane. You want the view to show that element therefore you would have to change the Top Plane to a height that is higher than the element needed in order for you to raise the cut plane to the height required (Hope this makes sense). If you raise the cut plane alone, it will give you an error because the Top Boundary will be lower than the cut plane.
          Juan Carlos Moreno
          Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
          Sisley Cosmetics

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            #6
            Originally posted by JCM View Post
            Well, lets assume that you have a double height atrium and you have an element that is above the top plane and the cut plane. You want the view to show that element therefore you would have to change the Top Plane to a height that is higher than the element needed in order for you to raise the cut plane to the height required (Hope this makes sense). If you raise the cut plane alone, it will give you an error because the Top Boundary will be lower than the cut plane.
            That's correct, but just to carry the OP's arguement a bit further, why do you even need a top plane? Why not just end it with the cut plane. Unless, as Ian stated, it calculates volumes and such. I would think those were calculated by the room height though?
            Dan

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              #7
              Welcome to the forum Sputnik. Great to see another Scandinavian here

              Not all objects will apear if they are sitting between the cutplane and the top plane, but things like: windows, casework, and generic models will (and maybe a few more, but don´t have Revit at hand to look)

              I mainly use this for showing rooflights (windows) and wall hung kitchen cabinets.

              Hope that explains it a little ? :beer:
              Klaus Munkholm
              "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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                #8
                The best explanation I've ever see was in Mastering Revit Architecture 2008 They have an excellent description and several graphics that clearly show what each option does. It's in Chapter 2, pgs 40-51, but especially 48 & 49.
                Nothing against, Phil, Eddy, and James, but 2008 edition is only year I've seen this particular explanation.
                I'd copy a few pages, but I suspect that would violate the copyright.
                Last edited by DaveP; February 4, 2011, 07:49 PM. Reason: Forgot the page numbers
                Dave Plumb
                BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

                CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by DaveP View Post
                  The best explanation I've ever see was in Mastering Revit Architecture 2008 They have an excellent description and several graphics that clearly show what each option does. It's in Chapter 2, pgs 40-51, but especially 48 & 49.
                  Nothing against, Phil, Eddy, and James, but 2008 edition is only year I've seen this particular explanation.
                  I'd copy a few pages, but I suspect that would violate the copyright.
                  dang! I have the Mastering books for '09, '10, and '11...no '08.
                  I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
                    Not all objects will apear if they are sitting between the cutplane and the top plane, but things like: windows, casework, and generic models will (and maybe a few more, but don´t have Revit at hand to look)
                    This is pretty much spot on, but to elaborate slightly, The top plane will allow you to show elements which have "overhead" linework
                    Revit BLOGGAGE

                    http://www.revic.org.au

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