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    model building/sharing protocol questions

    Hello!

    I'm a new user (glass and glazing industry) trying to figure out the best way to build and share my model. I've built the revit model of the building, and now the architect has requested my model for BIM collision detection. I submitted it, but it was rejected because it contained other trades products.

    So now I'm going through my model and deleting all the other trades (GFRC, Concrete, etc.) Is this the correct way to submit my model of glass and aluminum only?

    Also, I've built the model with walls that are constructed of part other trades (stud, gyp. bd.) and part my material (aluminum panel). Should I have built these walls in separate pieces?

    Any other glazing subs out there want to chime in on what is expected of us? (Chime in Dave Jones, I know you're out there!)

    Thanks for any input!

    #2
    Welcome to the forum!
    First of all: yes, I think that as a subcontractor you should build your model with only your own stuff. No "foreign" things in there because that will cause problems for the architect.
    BUT: general practise is that you receive the architect's model, link it into your own and use that as an underlay. From what you're saying, I get the feeling they didn't provide you with their model either? That would be just plain stupid...
    Martijn de Riet
    Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
    MdR Advies
    Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
      Welcome to the forum!
      First of all: yes, I think that as a subcontractor you should build your model with only your own stuff. No "foreign" things in there because that will cause problems for the architect.
      BUT: general practise is that you receive the architect's model, link it into your own and use that as an underlay. From what you're saying, I get the feeling they didn't provide you with their model either? That would be just plain stupid...
      All Architect's aren't using Revit yet so sometimes we have to recreate the building in Revit to have a "base" to add our scope of work to. I was interested in your idea of linking CAD Architectural drawing elevations on work planes to create a and will use that method when I run into a project that doesn't have a Revit model but CAD files are available.
      I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Anondrafter View Post
        Hello!

        I'm a new user (glass and glazing industry) trying to figure out the best way to build and share my model. I've built the revit model of the building, and now the architect has requested my model for BIM collision detection. I submitted it, but it was rejected because it contained other trades products.

        So now I'm going through my model and deleting all the other trades (GFRC, Concrete, etc.) Is this the correct way to submit my model of glass and aluminum only?

        Also, I've built the model with walls that are constructed of part other trades (stud, gyp. bd.) and part my material (aluminum panel). Should I have built these walls in separate pieces?

        Any other glazing subs out there want to chime in on what is expected of us? (Chime in Dave Jones, I know you're out there!)

        Thanks for any input!
        Hi Anondrafter, I think that the answer to your "problem" is worksets. You should be working on local files created from a central anyway so once there just create your scope of work on a "my scope" workset and have everything else on the standard Grids and Levels and Workset1. All of the building structure, walls, etc can be placed on Workset1 then turned off in the model that you provide for clash detection. If the Architect is using BIM clash detection then they obviously have a Revit model to do CD on so, like Martijn stated, it's stupid that you weren't provided that model to use as a linked . If they expect you to create a model without their model then they get your representation of the structure that you have to attach to, that's the way it is. BTW, something I learned early on in my still young Revit life: Never Delete Anything in a model. If you created it, it's valuable. And, you'd be surprised at what gets deleted in the when you think that you are deleting something in the foreground...been there, done that. I love Hide In View

        edit: I think that I know who you are...PM me to chat
        Last edited by Dave Jones; January 29, 2012, 12:01 AM. Reason: added invitation to PM
        I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
          All Architect's aren't using Revit yet so sometimes we have to recreate the building in Revit to have a "base" to add our scope of work to. I was interested in your idea of linking CAD Architectural drawing elevations on work planes to create a and will use that method when I run into a project that doesn't have a Revit model but CAD files are available.
          You mean the "fold a box" method?
          Basically, what I do in such circomstances is this:

          1. Open the cad-drawing provided by the architect. Save out all floor plans, sections and elevations to separate files using wblock (be sure to set the origin for every wblock to somewhere near the base of that drawing). Keep in mind to create a different dwg for all planes. So if you have a front elevation with one part laid back from the other part, create two separate dwg's for them. (this can get out of control when the architect is all about little corners and stuff, so in that case I usually cut some corners)
          2. Open Revit. Link in the Ground Floor
          3. Place Revit Levels for all levels that you need, Grids for coordination and named refplanes for all elevations/sections you created dwg's for.
          4. Link in the other dwg's and place them where they need to be.
          If all went well, you now have a fold-a-box model...

          If you have a simple example I'll set it up for you (you know, something rectangular with 3-4 floor plans). It's really easy once you get the hang of it.
          Martijn de Riet
          Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
          MdR Advies
          Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
            You mean the "fold a box" method?
            Basically, what I do in such circomstances is this:

            1. Open the cad-drawing provided by the architect. Save out all floor plans, sections and elevations to separate files using wblock (be sure to set the origin for every wblock to somewhere near the base of that drawing). Keep in mind to create a different dwg for all planes. So if you have a front elevation with one part laid back from the other part, create two separate dwg's for them. (this can get out of control when the architect is all about little corners and stuff, so in that case I usually cut some corners)
            2. Open Revit. Link in the Ground Floor
            3. Place Revit Levels for all levels that you need, Grids for coordination and named refplanes for all elevations/sections you created dwg's for.
            4. Link in the other dwg's and place them where they need to be.
            If all went well, you now have a fold-a-box model...

            If you have a simple example I'll set it up for you (you know, something rectangular with 3-4 floor plans). It's really easy once you get the hang of it.
            maybe another GTM when the situation arises. I only learn this stuff by doing it myself although I do appreciate the offer and the expertise!
            I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

            Comment


              #7
              Sure, GTM is fine...
              If you'd be able to setup the parts from autocad, it's just as easy to show you.
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by mdradvies View Post
                Welcome to the forum!
                First of all: yes, I think that as a subcontractor you should build your model with only your own stuff. No "foreign" things in there because that will cause problems for the architect.
                BUT: general practise is that you receive the architect's model, link it into your own and use that as an underlay. From what you're saying, I get the feeling they didn't provide you with their model either? That would be just plain stupid...
                Thanks for the reply!

                No, they provided their model, but I had no idea what to do with it. I thought that the best way to learn would be to build everything myself. And we have a revit consultant who led me to believe that was the direction to go in.

                Also, this is a design build project, so I didn't want to rely on the architects model too much, knowing that we ( the subcontractor) were in the position to actually direct the architect on some changes.

                So I think I may have to talk to the architect, and see what works best at this point in time?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hey Dave, thanks for the reply!

                  the myscope workset seems like the right thing, just not sure how to approach it at this point in time. Its design build too, so I dont think it would have worked to link there model, since we were still in the process of designing.

                  I was thinking the same thing, I shouldnt have to delete anything.

                  In hindsight, I should have gotten more info about what they expected from us in the beginning. The irritating part is, their revit consultant is the same guy that we use for revit consulting!

                  So if you have a panel system to provide, do you create it separate from the stud framing? Or can a workgroup be created with only a portion of the wall construction?

                  Btw, yep, you know me I'll PM you when I get a chance..

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Just another Point of View to consider:

                    What you are/were responsible to model SHOULD have been defined in either a Design Exhibit / BIM Execution document, or for our subcontractors- we use either the BIM-E or a seperate 3D Coordination Protocol exhibit delineating what they are responsible for.

                    But be advised: In cases where your scope of work is supposed to be the only thing in your model, the Worksets thing wont fly for everyone... Unless you delete everything else prior to sending the model. Worksets arent viable for all schedule interactions, or for other reporting features. So for a GC like us, we just want your scope of work in your file, and thats it.
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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