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Panel walls - Again

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    Panel walls - Again

    Hi all,

    I known this topic has been exhausted on another forum site, which shall remain nameless. I, like them did not have the foresight to save the threads for future reference.:crazy:
    Here is my issue. I have a very particular client, who, for what ever reason is valuable to him wants to......wait for it.........have his Revit drawings look like his old AutoCAD drawings. I know, I know......I bet you haven't heard that before.
    I have tried and tried to discuss the fact that this is Revit and not AutoCAD but that is another topic.
    OK. We are documenting a building that has external pre-cast concrete panels. Now, in plan the client wants to see the panel joints, actually shown as physical joints between each panel, fair enough, but in elevation he only wants to see 1 (one) line representing those same panel joints and horizontal banding.

    Any ideas how i can do this. I have tried some curtain walls which work OK. I do have issues when the walls are intersectin at angles to each other other than 90deg as these are to mitre joints.

    Any help greatly appreciated.:thumbsup:
    Andrew Harp
    BIM Manager GHD
    If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
    If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

    #2
    Perhaps in plan you can use a pattern on the wall (depending on the complexity and uniformity) you can specify a custom distance
    In the plan you can use a line based Detail Component that masks the joint and adds the detail that is required. This component can be locked to the wall so that if the wall moves the DC moves. Im sure the other Gurus here prob have a better solution but hopefully this points you in the right direction
    Juan Carlos Moreno
    Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
    Sisley Cosmetics

    Comment


      #3
      Line based Generic Model Family. Placed and Drawn in Elevation, with only a Model Line on that face. In a view perpendicular to it, you can have a Detail Component with a masking region and Joint detail that actually masks out the wall and makes it look broken at the joint. Plus, you can quantify them.
      Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
      @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

      Comment


        #4
        What about "Split with Gap" tool ( this tool is made for precast panels)? Gives you real joint in plan view. In elevation use "Linework" invisable line to get rid of one side of the joint.
        As for horizontal banding just make a wall reveal profile to suit.
        Attached Files
        Last edited by mark b; February 4, 2011, 05:51 AM.
        Mark Balsom

        If it ain't broke, fix it till it is.

        Comment


          #5
          Hi Mark,

          Yeah, we have tried that on previous projects. It works OK.
          One issue with that is that you can see objects through the panel join and I don't really want to have to traverse around the building using my line work tool. Same goes for the reveal, easy enough, but without the ability to independently change the thickness of the projected cut line in the wall, it just looks messy, and as my client likes to say "it doesn't look like cad"

          I will have to investigate Aaron's method for now.

          Any other suggestions???
          Andrew Harp
          BIM Manager GHD
          If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
          If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

          Comment


            #6
            I was going to type a lengthy answer on how to do this using DC's and Generic Models. Then I realised I use the same method as Aaron, only I place the line based family in plan view which automatically also creates the model lines in elevation view.

            Then I wanted to type an even more lengthy piece on how to accomplish this, since it requires some nesting of families, linking parameters, etc. But this will take too much time. Instead I created a dummy family for you to wrap your head around... good luck, and please post your findings.
            Attached Files
            Martijn de Riet
            Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
            MdR Advies
            Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

            Comment


              #7
              Thank you very much.

              Much appreciated. I will look through and let you know how I go with it.
              Andrew Harp
              BIM Manager GHD
              If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you.
              If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.

              Comment


                #8
                Where you place it is just a matter of preference. I make them do it in elevation, so the parametrics only have to control joint width, joint detailing (detail component), and wall/joint thickness. Plus, in elevation, they can quickly see if there is more than one wall they need to put the joint through. Another added benefit, is Line Based can host to a wall face, which will move with the wall. Drawn in plan, its workplane is the Level, unless you align it everywhere.
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                  Where you place it is just a matter of preference. I make them do it in elevation, so the parametrics only have to control joint width, joint detailing (detail component), and wall/joint thickness. Plus, in elevation, they can quickly see if there is more than one wall they need to put the joint through. Another added benefit, is Line Based can host to a wall face, which will move with the wall. Drawn in plan, its workplane is the Level, unless you align it everywhere.
                  True, never thought about it that much. I mostly draw in plan view, so to me this is the obvious orientation. Eacht their own I guess, principle remains the same.
                  Martijn de Riet
                  Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
                  MdR Advies
                  Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

                  Comment

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