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    Plotting too light

    I have recently completed a project using Revit and linked several of my details from ACAD; however, when I print out the documents, they do not print as shown on the screen. Most of the text and many of the lines are way too light.

    When I linked the drawings, I set the colors to black and white.
    When I go to print, under SETUP, I set the colors to Black lines and check replace halftone with thin lines.

    The image loooks good on the sceen; but fails to print with dark lines.

    Any help would be appreciated. I am up against a deadline and need to submit a legible set of documents.
    Jerry

    #2
    Did you try disabling "ThinLine" mode? This way you could see what will be printed lineweights..then if you want to change lineweights of any category or object then you will either need to make some adjustments in OBJECT STYLE or at local level per view basis by OVERRIDE GRAPHICS.
    Pfaulder | London, UK

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      #3
      does not seem to make any difference. Keep in miind that this is only an issue with the sheets which were linked in from ACAD. The sheets generated within REVIT appear to plot as displayed.

      Jerry

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        #4
        Acad imports are always a PITA especially when printing and are best avoided. Since that's not always an option try looking under the insert tab>Import> theres a small arrow on the tab. That arrow will bring up a list of cad colors that can be overridden to Revit pen weights. Most likely these are all set to 1. This will help with linework, but text will most likely still look like crap, especially if youre using something like RomanS.Capture.JPG

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          #5
          Jerry,
          I think you will find, if you go to Object Styles and Imported Objects, then open the appropriate DWG, most everything is going to be line weight 1, or at least not line weights you want. These settings are based on the pen # assigned to the layers in the DWG, unless you specifically manage the settings (Per Elliot ^). On a bright note, you can assign line weights here and it will affect every use of those DWGs. Of course, if you are linking in Acad sheets, every sheet will be a different DWG and you will need to make these edits over and over. And over. And over. And over. One more reason why "DWGs are bad, m'Kay."

          Also, FWIW, I have seen a number of offices try this hybrid Revit/AutoCAD work flow. I have seen exactly the same number of offices come to regret it. You are SO much better off actually fully using Revit. You can think of this hybrid approach as exactly the same as leaping a chasm in two bounds.

          Gordon
          Last edited by Gordon Price; January 16, 2012, 09:01 PM.
          Pragmatic Praxis

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            #6
            Does it help if you go through pdf first? What kind of printer are you using?
            Martijn de Riet
            Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
            MdR Advies
            Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

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              #7
              Thanks Gordon (and Elliot) for the reply. I will look into the line weights to see if this will help. Also to Martijn, we tried the pdf, same results. The strange thing is, the sheets look great on the sceen in Revit, just not when printed?

              The hybrid approach was not intentional, it just became a necessity on this project. We are new to Revit and are under a deadline to complete this project. We are in the exterior cladding industry and had over 100 sheets of highly detailed drawings already developed in ACAD on this project when we began with Revit. We did not have the time or resources to redraw all of the details in Revit for this first project. However, we will be making the transition into full Revit drawings as we go forward.

              BTW, How does Revit compare with ACAD when working with highly detailed and intricate parts, pieces, fasteners, etc.

              Thanks,
              Jerry

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                #8
                Originally posted by jerry_fci View Post
                BTW, How does Revit compare with ACAD when working with highly detailed and intricate parts, pieces, fasteners, etc.

                Thanks,
                Jerry
                it sucks (for me and IMO)! I'm a curtain wall and ACM panel detailer and do all of my details in Acad because I've got 20+ years of blocks and details accumulated and now most everything has been converted to dynamic blocks. I would take me years to recreate in Revit. My current project has over 400 linked CAD details, the project file remains small, loads fast, and prints great without any manipulation of lineweights in Revit. I'd be happy to compare notes with you regarding .dwg links and lineweights. PM me if you like or we can continue on here although it's a bit of a specialty conversation
                I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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