Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Would like add-in to total filled region areas and line lengths

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Would like add-in to total filled region areas and line lengths

    I'd like to create an add-in using the API for a job we're doing but need to look into how easy/hard it would be and what the cost in terms of time it would take to learn how to program as well as create the add-in. I did a couple of years of IT back in the late 90s at uni and just touched on C and Java back then but I basically haven't tried my hand at programming for 15 years so should really count myself as starting from scratch.

    We are working on a paint and render repair package for a heritage building. This essentially involves drawing filled regions and lines to indicate areas and cracks that need to be repaired. Different filled regions indicate different types of work required to an area and I have a linetype (and a couple of detail components) that represents cracking.

    Now, to make the whole process a little more BIM like, I'd love to be able to schedule the areas of repair works and the lengths of cracks. Given that a filled region has an area property and lines have a length property, it'd be nice if I could somehow add these up by type to present to tenderers to make costing much easier and consistent.

    How difficult would this be to achieve (is it even possible?).
    Michael
    Canberra, Australia

    #2
    Hi, I would do this without API.
    Use areas tool to schedule and tag areas, and a dummy family for cracks like a wall or a beam with appropriate material and line style.
    My 2 cts....
    Julien
    "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
    P. DAC
    Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

    Comment


      #3
      Julien is right, no API needed for this one. Line Based Generic Model with only model line in it to simulate cracks (and it has a scheduable length parameter)
      Generic Model wit Adaptive components to place on Walls for the areas that need repair (and I would use AC's so you can freely place any form from 1 family)
      Martijn de Riet
      Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
      MdR Advies
      Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

      Comment


        #4
        Interesting ideas, thanks.

        The reason I'm doing things the way I am is because we are working off an old AutoCAD survey of the elevations of the building. It's a very large and intricate building and it would be a huge waste of time to model it (although I'd love to have a go). The original survey used hatches to designate areas that needed repair and, of course, linework to show where cracking had occured. Since the original drawings are not quite correct, I've imported the AutoCAD drawings into Revit and have committed the mortal sin of exploding them and have been converting linework and hatches to something I can work with.

        Using area plans and line-based families could still work in this situation although it'd require re-drawing every hatch and crack that is already there which is what I'm trying to avoid. It may be the best way in the end, however...
        Michael
        Canberra, Australia

        Comment


          #5
          frankly, in your situation, you'd better stay in the cad world. LISP and OOTB features will do the work in minutes once the file is clean (hatches closed, polylines etc...).

          why are you trying to solve this in Revit without modeling the building? You can find gold in some features in Autocad, s.a. elements properties schedules (should be "data extraction" in english).

          If some Reviters out there read what you've done with your CAD files, they probably had a heart attack at this moment, please call 911!!!:laugh:
          and I think Aaron will burn his screen with his angry look....:hide:

          anyway, good luck!
          Julien
          "Au royaume des aveugles, les borgnes sont mal vus!"
          P. DAC
          Follow me on Twitter @Jbenoit44 - Blog: http://aecuandme.wordpress.com/

          Comment


            #6
            Well, I've been using Revit since 2003 and stopped using AutoCAD in about 2004... So I find I'm terribly slow at trying to do anything in AutoCAD and have no knowledge whatsoever of using LISP or any AutoCAD functions that were introduced in the last 8 years. The last stage of this job we did by linking the files into Revit and it took me forever to work on them in CAD so this time I thought I'd have a go at keeping everything in the one file. Still two more stages of the job to go after this one so maybe I'll get the process down by then! Essentially it's a horrible job that I wish would be over!!
            Michael
            Canberra, Australia

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jbenoit44 View Post
              If some Reviters out there read what you've done with your CAD files, they probably had a heart attack at this moment,
              Well I'm a Reviteer with Autocad origins, and I'm quite shocked, but that's neither here nor there; I too would attempt, as you are, to use Revit. Even though Autocad may be the better, faster tool for the task - I share the goal to be a bit more "BIM" in our workflows.

              Some might call it overkill but your scenario could easily scale in complexity to a point where using a BIM tool (like Revit) would be clearly beneficial. Consider the refurb of a large, tall histroic building. The pointing of brickwork say, or the patching of a lead roof; the rewards for contractors to consider scaffolding, crane management, material transport and safety measures, within a modelled environment, could all bear the fruits of an economical and efficient delivery.

              So if I were you, I'd give it a go! I'd link (not insert & explode) your .dwg plans, floor at a time, into a respective (Revit) plan view, lay down some "real" system family walls (in Revit) according to the plan(s), then set up a pair of opposing elevations for each wall and use the split face tool to "paint" the differing surface types, and schedule their respective "materials" for areas, and, if so inclined, volume.

              In addition, you could use a line based component, of differing types (perhaps width, to control a line-like thickness), that you report the length(s) of via shared parameter, into a schedule where you can tally the lengths of (say) significant cracks. Thinking about it now, I'm wondering if that could be done another way - one in which you might be able to "locate" cracks by some degree of vector-coordinates for reports (I don't know) ? Interesting question though.:thumbsup:

              Comment


                #8
                As I said, I'd love to, but the scale of the building and the time I have to do the job prohibits this. The building in question is Old Parliament House in Canberra which would take me a very long time to model - especially to the degree that the previously surveyed elevations have been drawn. Not to mention how out of square this building is. I think I'd end up with a very nice looking but not particularly accurate model of how the building stands today.
                Michael
                Canberra, Australia

                Comment


                  #9
                  Aaron wouldnt burn anything with an angry look... Nothin but love for people doing things there own way (even wrong).

                  The trouble is, people forget the "using BIM" isnt a "Model everything" or "Model nothing" choice. Thats why Revit is going to fail you in this exercise, and make no mistake about it: If you try to force it to work like CAD, it is GOING to fail you.

                  As mentioned, a Line Based Generic Model will schedule length, and its one reference plane away from scheduling Area. Thats assuming youre okay scheduling rectangles for area. If youre not? You can make Face Based families (which can easily be placed on work planes in five seconds at placement)and you can have circles, trapezoids, whatever shape you feel like making. Or- as already mentioned- just define the number of "placement points" you want to use, and make a series of Adaptive Components.

                  All in all, that will take you less than 30 minutes to set up. Then you can schedule TYPES of repair, LENGTHS of repair, AREAS, etc. Best of all, it can even then start to provide things like perimeter, sealant requirements, blocking, etc. Here is the funny part: Who says you need the building modeled at all? Link (not import) your CAD garbage in to all of your views, and use your Line Based or Face based Generic MODELS on top of the CAD junk. It still schedules, and its still smart. And because they can all host to work PLANES, there is ZERO reason this would take any longer than what youre doing now, except lack of understanding. You dont have to model ANYTHING on the existing building to make Revit go to work for you.

                  The PROBLEM is, people think they can predefine what TOOL in Revit is the RIGHT one. A Filled Region in Revit is junk. Pure and simple. Its a lousy stupid hatch field, because someone decided they needed a dumb hatch field. Schedule all of them in the project? Sure. Find a way to do it, then get ticked off when all of the drafting views in your template show up too. Drafted = junk.

                  And to clear the record, i think because of my mindset, most people forget that ive supported AutoCAD and ACA as recently as 2010. Hell, i support it now, when our guys in the field have to deal with CAD garbage from other firms. AutoCAD is a hugely capable tool, and- when configured and deployed properly- can do some amazing things. And you best believe i have an ACA template and infrastructure just like my Revit one, lol. Its just a simple fact of life, that they play together as well as a ballerina and a linebacker in a soccer tournament.
                  Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                  @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The main reason I've gone down the path I have is to avoid redrawing work. About 80% of the cracks and areas were defined on the AutoCAD drawings yet, for some reason, the hatch patterns are inconsistent and in some cases the areas just not correct anymore. Also, there is a bit of new work to be done when drawing the actual elevations. If I was more adept in using AutoCAD then I'm sure I could get things done a lot faster using tools within that environment to schedule things. However, as I mentioned, I've barely touched the program in many years and am very unfamiliar with it now so prefer to do my drafting (even 2D) within the Revit environment.

                    I appreciate all the advice given but since I'm not starting from scratch, and the building is very complex (the most complex repair areas would have an easy 30 or more vertices although I acknowledge I could always use smaller areas to build one larger one), I just want to be able to work with what I have. Using areas, face based families etc would be great if nothing had been drawn yet but that's not the situation I'm in and I don't have the time against the job to re-draw all those areas again (we're talking $6 million worth of painting works).

                    Given, that using the API seems a no-go, the only real option I have is going back and working out AutoCAD and figuring out how to use an appropriate LISP routine or whatever OOTB tools AutoCAD currently has.
                    Michael
                    Canberra, Australia

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X