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    Tracing a CAD Drawing

    OK, I know this is dumb but, coming from Archicad, we had a straight forward, load a cad drawing and trace the wall outlines with the wall command...and it was a wall. What does one do in Revit? I can create an mass but doesn't take kindly to hosting windows doors etc?
    Robert Costa, Principal
    Breukel Costa Architects

    Sydney, Australia

    Revit on ...prescription...
    Windows 7 on Imac 27" quad core, VMware

    #2
    I would import or link the cad file - Insert Tab - (do not explode the cad file, but simply have it sit there as an underlay) and then use the pick line option when creating the walls of the building.

    Leave in place to pick the locations of doors windows etc.

    Once I had copied everything I could, I would then delete the cad file entirely and carry on in Revit.
    Ian Kidston
    http://allextensions.com.au

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      #3
      In Revit, link your CAD file into your view ("In this view only"), select the wall tool, and start tracing away.

      There's no "auto trace" tool if that's what you're looking for.

      When using the Wall tool, you can use "Pick Lines" to select lines in your CAD drawing to make it go faster. Furthermore, when selecting a line (using Pick Lines), you can hit the tab key to potentially select a chain of lines.

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        #4
        I would make the Walls category transparent in the view you are working in as well. Makes it much easier when you can see the DWG you are tracing even after the walls are in. Especially helps with door and window placement.

        Gordon
        Pragmatic Praxis

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          #5
          Originally posted by Gordon Price View Post
          I would make the Walls category transparent in the view you are working in as well. Makes it much easier when you can see the DWG you are tracing even after the walls are in. Especially helps with door and window placement.

          Gordon
          I have found this to be very true and efficient
          Juan Carlos Moreno
          Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
          Sisley Cosmetics

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by iru69 View Post
            In Revit, link your CAD file into your view ("In this view only"), select the wall tool, and start tracing away.

            There's no "auto trace" tool if that's what you're looking for.

            When using the Wall tool, you can use "Pick Lines" to select lines in your CAD drawing to make it go faster. Furthermore, when selecting a line (using Pick Lines), you can hit the tab key to potentially select a chain of lines.
            Be advised though: the chain of walls can get messy if the dwg isn't set up correctly. The chain-command will give you a separate wall for each part of the chain. If the dwg is modelled using a lot of small linepieces, your Revit Walls will follow... This needs adressing later on. Also the ENTIRE chain will be composed of 1 wall TYPE.

            On another note: you need to set the correct location line for this. A location line defines where the wall is placed in reference to the sketch line you are placing / picking when creating a wall. Let's say that you want to trace the autocad drwaing and want to use the Pick Lines option. In this case you would have to decide to pick only Interior or Exterior lines and set the Location Line accordingly (LL is to be found in the Properties Pallette and/or Option Bar after you select the Wall function.
            Martijn de Riet
            Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
            MdR Advies
            Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Ian.Kidston View Post
              I would import or link the cad file - Insert Tab - (do not explode the cad file, but simply have it sit there as an underlay) and then use the pick line option when creating the walls of the building.

              Leave in place to pick the locations of doors windows etc.

              Once I had copied everything I could, I would then delete the cad file entirely and carry on in Revit.
              Am I correct in understanding that I need to measure the thickness of the wall before using pickline?..so when the wall changes fromm 100mm to 270 to 230, I need to switch wall types? So you can't just trace around the walls without knowing the thickness?
              Robert Costa, Principal
              Breukel Costa Architects

              Sydney, Australia

              Revit on ...prescription...
              Windows 7 on Imac 27" quad core, VMware

              Comment


                #8
                Yes, this is correct.

                If it is a brick veneer external wall then that is the wall type selected to pick those walls and the swaped out for an internal stud wall or whichever type you need.
                Ian Kidston
                http://allextensions.com.au

                Comment


                  #9
                  And now that everyone has told you how, here is a big piece of advice that i have seen new users struggle with while learning Revit: Dont trace CAD at all.

                  1. They have different levels of accuracy. You may not have problems for awhile, but weird things start to happen when you trace CAD drawings. Lines that were parallel in CAD are not in Revit, higher numbers of Fatal errors due to graphics problems, walls that dimension down to the 1/256" with a break in the dimension string (1/512") even though Revit only goes down to 1/256:, etc.

                  2. Pick line doesnt always help you because people draw in CAD differently than people model in Revit. A lot of firms still using CAD still believe a 4-7/8" wall is okay shown as 5". And a block wall is 8".

                  3. The CAD file itself being there, is a problem. CAD file visibility brings on degraded performance, graphics cards issues, file bloat, etc. BTW< dont EVER EVER use the IMPORT CAD button. If ANYTHING, use the LINK CAD button.

                  But if it were me, reconsider the workflow. If its a designer drawing in CAD, make them do plans in revit. its the same click to draw a wall in ACA as it is a wall in Revit. If its an old project, take the time to read the drawings and model it without tracing.

                  Itll cost you more time than it saves you. My two cents.
                  Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                  @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
                    Itll cost you more time than it saves you. My two cents.
                    I assume this was meant the other way around? You'd better watch out Aaron or you'll get the rep of the "Anti CAD"
                    :hide:
                    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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