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    Lenovo Thinkstation for Building Design Suite?

    Hi All!
    After so many years that we have always bought Dell workstations ... Today we decided to change, for several reasons :-)
    Ok. Our choice should fall on Lenovo S20 or D20 series. The alternative is to buy a computer "assembled," I do not know how to say in English, looking for the best individual components.
    We have the Building Design Suite Premium. Our primary use is Revit Architecture, but soon we will also render with 3DS.
    Is there anyone who uses the Lenovo workstations? One of our concerns is whether it makes sense to take the D20 with the Xeon processor ...
    thanks

    #2
    For general Revit use, I don't think the S20 or D20 is a good solution. They use very outdated versions of the Xeon CPU. Look at the E30 instead, which uses the Sandy Bridge Xeon. Configure with an E3-1240 or better CPU; non-ECC RAM (at least 8GB or more depending on your needs); Quadro 2000 video adapter.

    For a "rendering" machine, the D20 with two Xeon X5647 (2x4=8 cores) or X5690 (2x6=12 cores) CPUs, etc., is a fine way to go. However, in my opinion, that's an insane amount of money to spend on a Revit computer unless having the "fastest" rendering machine is a critical part of your business and will pay for itself.

    Xeons are expensive, and only offer a practical advantage if you get dual (two) Xeon CPUs. Unfortunately dual-capable Xeons (as in the D20) are way behind the times, and it's unknown exactly when they will be updated to Sandy Bridge or maybe not until Ivy Bridge sometime next year. The Sandy Bridge i7 CPUs offer a much better value, i.e. the i7-2600 or i7-2700 (they are equivalent to the Xeon E3 CPUs I mentioned in the Lenovo E30).

    Not quite sure what you're trying to say/ask as an "alternative", but if you mean to buy the parts individually and assemble the computer yourself, that's a great way to go if you have the technical resources to do so.

    Best of luck!

    Originally posted by warburg View Post
    Hi All!
    After so many years that we have always bought Dell workstations ... Today we decided to change, for several reasons :-)
    Ok. Our choice should fall on Lenovo S20 or D20 series. The alternative is to buy a computer "assembled," I do not know how to say in English, looking for the best individual components.
    We have the Building Design Suite Premium. Our primary use is Revit Architecture, but soon we will also render with 3DS.
    Is there anyone who uses the Lenovo workstations? One of our concerns is whether it makes sense to take the D20 with the Xeon processor ...
    thanks

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks iru. My dealer offered me this Lenovo D20: Intel Xeon SIX Core E5645 + INTEL SSD/320 Series 120Gb 2.5" SATA 3Gb + 18Gb RAM 1333Mhz DDR3 ECC + Nvidia Quadro 4000 + 2x 2Tb SATA 7200rpm 3.5"... with a price of 3000 euros excluding VAT... Not a bad offer, what do you think? The Xeon E5645 came from first quarter/2010, would not seem so old...
      Alternative: buy a Dell Precision or HP Z series, or even a computer "without brand", here in Italy there are many good builders that use very good components. BUT: the workstation is not certified, there is no onsite warranty, etc etc etc...
      Some old friends and colleagues tell me: buy an Intel i7 3930K SixCore 3.2GHz LGA2011 and live happy :banghead:

      Comment


        #4
        Or a "Born in the Usa" machine like the BOXX | The Professional's Choice ? :bb:

        Comment


          #5
          I don't think the S20 or D20 is a good solution.
          [img]http://www.tara-mediumss.com/qinp3.jpg[/img][img]http://www.tara-mediumss.com/qinp4.jpg[/img]
          [img]http://www.tara-mediumss.com/qinp5.jpg[/img][img]http://www.tara-mediumss.com/qinp2.jpg[/img]

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Eric2012 View Post
            I don't think the S20 or D20 is a good solution.
            Why not good?

            Comment


              #7
              Warburg,

              Your dealer may be offering you a good "deal", but I don't think that's a good configuration for Revit.



              The Westmere E56xx series is a die-shrink of Nahelem, so even though the E5645 is "only" 2 years old, the CPU architecture it's based on is over 3 years old now, i.e. Westmere didn't offer a significant speed increase over Nahelem (the Westmere i7-980 was released only 6 months ago, but core to core, Sandy Bridge is significantly faster... so looking at the date a CPU was released is not an accurate guide). Additionally, the E5645 is only 2.4GHz... too slow! Even for rendering, dual E5645 CPUs aren't going to have much over the fastest Sandy Bridge 4-core CPUs, and should be slower than a single 6 core Sandy Bridge-E.


              Sandy Bridge-E is to Sandy Bridge what the i7-9xx was to the i7-8xx. The Sandy Bridge-E shouldn't be significantly faster than the original Sandy Bridge (at least as it applies to most Revit related tasks), but the 3930 has the six cores, which would be great for rendering. It also has quad channel RAM, which would be really interesting to see if it has a noticeable impact on general Revit performance. Sandy Bridge-E is a bit more expensive platform, but if you want best of all worlds (6 Sandy Bridge cores), it's definitely the CPU to get right now. However, I don't know which big box suppliers offer it.

              Comment


                #8
                Mmmm... ok, I understand ... The "problem" is that the workstations, HP, Dell or Lenovo currently does not mount the new Intel i7 Intel SixCore 39xx ... and who knows when they will!
                One question: suppose that for my job rendering is not so important. Or rather, I suppose I satisfied renderings from Revit. And then there's Autodesk Cloud ... In short, a workstation for this type of activity is very different, or not? I mean, I could be content with a slower processor and invest more of RAM and video card, what do you think?

                Comment


                  #9
                  CPU is king. 18GB of RAM and a Quadro 4000 video card isn't of much help if the CPU is slow.

                  If you need to stick with Nehalem/Westmere, it's still a good CPU, but you need the fastest ones (e.g. 3.2GHz or preferably even faster).

                  The computer configurations that are available in Italy are different from US, so sorry, I can't be of much help there.
                  Last edited by iru69; December 4, 2011, 09:54 PM.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thank you very much.

                    Comment

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