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how can I model a waffle slab

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    how can I model a waffle slab

    I need to model a coffered or waffle concrete floor slab. The best I could think of is to create an in-place mass of the void and then using join geometry to attach the extrusion to my floor. This somewhat worked because now my mass has coffered the floor giving me the correct profile but the mass is still visible. For now I have toggled the view settings to not show any in-place mass within in my model but is there a way to do this correctly?

    I don't know why but Revit would not let me create a void form to cut into my floor. Should I try making this coffered system as a floor family? What would be really be ideal is if somehow I can create a coffered floor type and apply it to my existing model.

    this is my end result, but notice that the mass I created is there but simply hidden

    thanks

    1.JPG
    2.JPG
    Last edited by billiam; November 10, 2011, 02:33 PM.

    #2
    The search function can sometimes answer the questions

    http://www.revitforum.org/architectu...challenge.html
    http://www.revitforum.org/architectu...ffle-slab.html
    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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      #3
      Good old Munkholm to the rescue there... but as an update to my own thread (the first link) we ended up going with the beam system method as it suits our design (now) better.

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        #4
        If you have to do Structural Analysis on it, i believe you want to go with the additive route, since anything that voids out part of the slab causes issues. However, we use a Face based of Floor Hosted family, that gets placed in plan and has type properties for width, taper, and depth, and instance properties for the length, so we can model the Structural Engineers intent for Pan Joist Slabs and the like very quickly.

        EDIT: We like the Void family method because its much faster when you get to the ends of the slabs, where they arent always straight, and so there are varying edges where the pans end, and there are solid pieces. You can do it either way, but its crazy fast with the family that cuts... SHows great in plans too.
        Last edited by Twiceroadsfool; November 11, 2011, 12:50 PM.
        Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
        @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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