Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

basic wall question...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    basic wall question...

    It seems like this would be a simple issue, but I just cant find an answer. We are still in the implementation phase of revit 2012 and trying to build our library.

    We do a lot of interior refits and work with existing ceilings.

    First question: is there a way to constrain walls to ceiling? In other words, walls placed in a room with a ceiling would extend to ceiling automatically, or do you just have to select unconnected and enter a height?

    Second question: we do some partitions where the stud goes to deck, but the GWB extends only to 6" above ceiling. The solution I came up with was a stacked wall, GWB/stud/GWB to a certain point, then stud only to deck. I tried modifying the wall assembly, but even after I unlock the GWB layer, the stud still moves as if connected. The problem with the stacked wall solution is each time the ceiling height changes, we would have to create another stacked wall with different heights.

    any suggestions would be appreciated.

    #2
    1. Unlock the Gyp. Bd. layer should allow you to control it separately from the studs. Another new way in RAC 2012 is Parts. You could create Parts and unlock the Shape Handle of the gyp. bd. layer and control it that way.

    2. Just use Attach and select the ceilings to attach the walls to.
    Cliff B. Collins
    Registered Architect
    The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
    Autodesk Expert Elite

    Comment


      #3
      1. Draw your ceiling. Then use the attach tool. To do this, I would go to a section. Select the wall. The tool will appear in the modify tab on the ribbon. Select the attach tool, then the ceiling. Now, when you move the ceiling, the wall will follow.

      2. I would unlock the layer as you described. The stud will still move unless you set the top extension distance in the properties of the wall.
      Keep in mind that, once you attach the wall, the offset will disappear. It needs to be unattached.

      Dab nabit. Cliff beat me again.
      Dan

      Comment


        #4
        For walls up to ceiling height:
        I almost always create a ceiling "level" for each floor and put the ceiling on that level. Then in the walls properties I have them going up to that level.
        The advantage over attaching the walls to the ceiling is that if you delete/recreate the ceiling your walls dont change height. It also means that a whole lot of other elements can be hosted on the "ceiling level" - like soffits etc
        Alex Page
        RevitWorks Ltd
        Check out our Door Factory, the door maker add-in for Revit

        Comment


          #5
          thanks all. I'll see what I can do with this.

          Comment


            #6
            I still prefer stacked walls to unlocking layers. If you think multiple types of Stacked Walls suck, wait til you see how long it takes to unlock layers on every single wall and drag them manually.

            What we really need is for walls to have "different heights" that can be defined, for different layers, at the type definition: But not in the sense of an actual height, in the sense of what objects are attached to which *height*. Then we could tell Gyp side 1 to be attached to underside of "Height plane 2" and Gyp side 2 to go to 8 inches above Height PLane 2, while Studs go all the way to height plane one. It sounds complicated, but then you would just have two "planes" you could attach, and the entire thing would kick ass.

            As it is now, its so tedious and non-value-adding we just model the GYP all the way up. It doesnt hurt you in clash detection, and the estimators are smart enough to redact it out, since they know. They can remove the QTO faster than we can model that correctly, making it moot until we get better tools.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

            Comment


              #7
              I agree - I always model my GYP all they way up, but it is a pet peeve of mine since I can see it in my sections......
              Alex Page
              RevitWorks Ltd
              Check out our Door Factory, the door maker add-in for Revit

              Comment


                #8
                Edit Cut Profile = Fixing it where it shows up in sections = still faster than screwing off with unlocked wall layers.
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                Comment


                  #9
                  yeah - thats what I do as well: It's when someone adds a wall and you have to remember go into any section that cuts it...
                  Alex Page
                  RevitWorks Ltd
                  Check out our Door Factory, the door maker add-in for Revit

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Parts in 2012 is always another option.
                    Cliff B. Collins
                    Registered Architect
                    The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
                    Autodesk Expert Elite

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X