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Realism, Photomontage, and rendering.

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    Realism, Photomontage, and rendering.

    Recently I have become the defacto rendering guy. It's a bit odd because I never considered myself much of a renderer and I would rather be designing, but that's beside the point.

    We are currently struggling with real vs. conceptual in our renderings. It seems that the more we strive for realistic renderings, the deeper we fall into the Uncanny Valley.

    Clients respond well to realism, but when we place our renderings into photographs, the chaotic nature of the photo presents a stark contrast to clean, sterile, rendered building.

    I have been investigating a number of less realistic rendering options, but most of them are useful only as progress renderings, not as final boards the client can use for fund raising or promotion.

    I was curious as to what solutions you all have come up with as well as your take on the discussion.

    #2
    Check out this Link
    Maybe it will give you some ideas
    Juan Carlos Moreno
    Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
    Sisley Cosmetics

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      #3
      WOW! Nice link. I love finding/being shown new web sites like this. So much out there, and Google just isn't the way to find the good stuff. That requires a recommendation from an actual human.

      Thanks,
      Gordon
      Pragmatic Praxis

      Comment


        #4
        Well, that's always a problem in Revit, especially with interiors.
        I don't really have a solution for this. I have exterior renderings which truly look like a photograph, but also occasions where I can't seem to get the "that's-just-not-quite-it"factor out.
        Keep trying, that's my best advise. Also a touchup with some Photoshop filters always seems to work.
        Martijn de Riet
        Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
        MdR Advies
        Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

        Comment


          #5
          You'll really need Photoshop (or something like it) to make this work.

          One of the biggest problems is that the color space of your rendering is probably very different than your picture. The most common problem I see with renderings is this right here. It's what makes your rendering look flat, or cartoony, or whatever. Learn a little bit about color balance and assume that you'll need to tweak colors outside of Revit to make it really work. A good place to start is to simply lower the overall color saturation of your rendering to match the photo. Pictures, esp. outside ones, rarely have very saturated colors (unless they were taken by a pro, with good lighting, etc.). Yet your rendering is always perfect in that way. So just lowering all the color saturation about 10% will go a long ways sometimes. Learning about Levels and Curves will help a lot, too. But you basically want to make it so that your rendered image matches the background photo color-wise prior to doing much else.

          The other big thing is that it's faster to match the camera/image size/image crop in Revit to the photo then to edit the rendering to fit the photo. You want it so that once you import the Rendered image into Photoshop that it overlays the background photo very well, matched up, and all that, without extra work. That way when you re-render, you don't also have to redo a bunch of work. If you can figure out where the person was standing who took the background shot it can really help. But getting the two images to align as much as possible will also go a long ways towards helping out.

          Lastly, sometimes you'll need to make more than one rendering and then paste them together in Photoshop. I did a scene once where it was a street shot, full of trees, that needed to overlay an existing photo. In order to really pull it off I needed to make a rendering with the trees, a rendering without the trees, and a rendering of just the trees, so that I could properly overlay the layers of each into the scene to make it look convincing by fading one layer into the next and into the original photo.
          Jeffrey McGrew
          Architect & Founder
          Because We Can, a Design-Build Studio
          Check out our new sister company Model No. making sustainable 3D printed furniture!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Gordon Price View Post
            WOW! Nice link. I love finding/being shown new web sites like this. So much out there, and Google just isn't the way to find the good stuff. That requires a recommendation from an actual human.

            Thanks,
            Gordon
            No problem! I have also found that to be true.

            I'll try to do a collection of links for "Inspiration" in the rendering gallery when I have the chance
            Juan Carlos Moreno
            Store Designer & Merchandising Manager
            Sisley Cosmetics

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by JCM View Post
              No problem! I have also found that to be true.

              I'll try to do a collection of links for "Inspiration" in the rendering gallery when I have the chance
              Nice link! Would love to see more if you have them...
              Martijn de Riet
              Professional Revit Consultant | Revit API Developer
              MdR Advies
              Planta1 Revit Online Consulting

              Comment


                #8
                In Romania we have some talented people. Maybe you find some intersesting works
                http://www.pixelenlargement.com/medi...ure%202010.pdf

                and some movies
                http://www.pixelenlargement.com/?pag...3&filter=video

                of course,... not revit but if you have max, vray, photoshop, afterefects why not

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