Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Constraining actual size change in family

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Constraining actual size change in family

    I've seen several threads dealing with this subject, but I can't for the life of me get this to work (...)

    I'm have simple cabinets, each with its own size constraint. The attached is a cabinet that can have a length of between 65-95 cm. and a depth of 40-50 cm. I can constrain the final data (Length Actual/Depth Actual) so that it conforms to those numbers - but the family itself takes on whatever value the user puts in.
    If the naughty user will specifiy Length Var as 120, the output data - Length Actual - will be 95, as it is set as the maximum value for it, but the "actual" length of the cabinet in the model will be 120 (see attached file). Same goes for the depth value.

    fam_length_exmpl.png


    How do I constrain the geometry to adhere to the parameters I sat out to constrain it? What am I missing here?

    The file is Revit 2019
    Attached Files
    Last edited by yatz57; February 24, 2021, 11:10 AM.

    #2
    So, yeah - (unsurprisingly) I'm a moron. After 3 hours of banging my head against the wall I realised that I connected the dimensions to the wrong parameters. Perhaps I should have been thinking instead of banging my head against walls...

    Comment


      #3
      I also found banging my head against a wall counterproductive, so I switched to head scratching. At least works for me. I recommend changing where you scratch so that bald spots do not appear when creating complex families with formulas
      Last edited by Nurlan; March 5, 2021, 08:59 AM. Reason: :)

      Comment


        #4
        One overlooked aspect of being part of a forum like this is the mere writing of a post will often provoke within us the answer, even before/without a reply to the post.

        The process of writing out our question forces us to reconsider how clear we think our assumptions or understanding has been. That process simmers after hitting send and will often provide other ideas, often confirmed by replies later.
        Last edited by Steve_Stafford; March 5, 2021, 07:16 AM.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Nurlan View Post
          - - - I recommend changing where you scratch so that bald spots do not appear - - -
          Oh, that train has long past left the station, my friend.
          Last edited by yatz57; March 5, 2021, 07:41 AM.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Steve_Stafford View Post
            One overlooked aspect of being part of a forum like this is the mere writing of a post will often provoke within us the answer, even before/without a reply to the post.

            The process of writing out our question forces us to reconsider how clear we think our assumptions or understanding has been. That process simmers after hitting send and will often provide other ideas, often confirmed by replies later.
            This is SO true. Half the time im writing an email to someone to ask about a problem, i figure it out midway through the novel that is my email. LOL.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

            Comment


              #7
              I guess writing an email is the Working From Home equivalent of what I call Proximity Logic.
              I've always told people that software works better when there's an IT person standing nearby.
              I joke, but I think it's actually true, because when the user shows someone else the "problem",
              "Huh, it worked that time."
              That's because they were more careful and actually went through all of the steps involved instead of skipping step 3.
              Dave Plumb
              BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

              CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by DaveP View Post
                I guess writing an email is the Working From Home equivalent of what I call Proximity Logic.
                I've always told people that software works better when there's an IT person standing nearby.
                I joke, but I think it's actually true, because when the user shows someone else the "problem",
                "Huh, it worked that time."
                That's because they were more careful and actually went through all of the steps involved instead of skipping step 3.
                I prefer to believe in the magic of having an observer that just makes it work.

                Comment

                Related Topics

                Collapse

                Working...
                X