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Interior Design- Workset or Seperate Model?

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    Interior Design- Workset or Seperate Model?

    We are fortunate enough to have hired an in house interior designer at our firm and we have her set up on a separate Workset on her first project. We have not had any earth shattering issues However I am starting to wonder if I should set up a separate linked model instead as all our our interior sheets are separate anyway. Looking for Pro’s & Con’s.
    Thanks In Advance!

    #2
    If there is a need to generate FF&E schedules based on rooms (what furniture is in which room), I would use worksets. Furniture inserted into rooms in a linked model are not room aware.

    If this is not a concern, then a link might be more convenient.

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      #3
      If the model size and RAM are appropriately matched I would do neither. Just put the interiors stuff in the model and be done with it. If RAM is an issue, then an Interior workset purely for memory management is an appropriate solution. But worksets should not be considered a "security" tool, nor a visibility control tool.
      It should be noted that there is a difference between best practice (single model, no separate work set, adequate RAM) and "least scary practice with new users." It sounds like the OP is really considering the latter. And I like option three, lots of good training and support rather than working in and trying to mitigate fear.
      It is also worth noting that once you get beyond furniture, finishes and the like are nearly impossible to do in a separate model, there is just too much interaction with the "architecture". Single model and Filters/View Templates to control visibility then become the best long term answer.

      Gordon
      Pragmatic Praxis

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        #4
        I've done the linked interior model method, and will never go back - it's worksets all the way.

        We used to do interior models + architecture models because of office seperation - so worksets weren't an option (pre Revit Server) - and the hassle it caused was unbearable. Yes, room aware scheduling didn't work - but that was by no means the worst of it - it simply boiled down to the fact that we were drawing lines between our teams - rather than equipping both with equal opportunities to progress our designs.

        The whole "Can you move the wall..." and "Why the hell have you put that there?!" exchange is intolerable - and could so easily be countered with a relaxing of "who does what" and a promotion of communication along the lines of "I want to do this, what do you think?". Clearly, that working relationship will need parameters - but then that's the case with any workflow.

        Beyond that, consider the global impact of going the linked model route. Off the top of my head, here's some drawbacks :
        1. You will need all your families to be either face or workplane hosted if they're to remain coordinated through linking.
        2. You will need to use copy/monitor to manage changes in/between the two models.
        3. Documentation will be segregated.
        4. You will be limited to tab-through selections.
        5. VG settings become more complex.
        6. You need to administrate/manage two models rather than one.



        Personally, I see no benefits.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Gordon Price View Post
          It is also worth noting that once you get beyond furniture, finishes and the like are nearly impossible to do in a separate model, there is just too much interaction with the "architecture". Single model and Filters/View Templates to control visibility then become the best long term answer.

          Gordon
          Great Point above...That could cause issues for sure. I was in the process of creating the view filters then I started thinking of this... but I think I'll stick to the model.
          Thanks!

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            #6
            We actually do a bit of "both"--

            We have a Shell and Core Model--Architectural only
            We also have an ID Model, which contains interior "partitions" as well as Finishes for walls, floors, ceilings, casework, etc.
            We have a separate Furniture Model as well.

            Each of these models has strict Workset organization for elements to be placed on. This helps organize both the models and the team members--allows for specific tasks and corresponding elements in the models to be easily allocated among team members.

            We can create Sheets for SC and ID from each model and issue separate packages, or print/combine--depends on project requirements.

            Works well, esp. with newer features of Revit 2012 with improvements in Linked Model coordination.
            Last edited by cliff collins; September 29, 2011, 10:28 PM.
            Cliff B. Collins
            Registered Architect
            The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
            Autodesk Expert Elite

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              #7
              Thanks to all for the feedback. I am planning on sticking with the workset for this smaller project but will keep the options open for the larger ones.
              Thanks again!
              Nate

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                #8
                We are playing around with the idea of a separate FF&E model as our last project tags were deleted somehow (of course nobody assumes responsibility) out of the main model.

                I kinda like the idea of a shell and core model...for that we usually put it in an earlier phase.
                Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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