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    Exported revit schedule

    so ive got a program that can export Revit schedules to excel.

    but I want to link all this data from the export into the standard excel schedules our company uses, maybe have the Revit export on a different tab and standard company scheduled to link the info into this?

    and maybe update the standard scheudle which in to updates the revit export, for exporting back into revit?#

    anyone know of any programs that could do this? or how do it

    #2
    yeah, Dynamo;

    There are a few good programs like BIMLink but to do something specificaly linked to datasheets in the way you want to you will probably need the flexibility of a programming language, or dynamo if youre a "programmer who doesnt know any programming languages" like me...
    "One must imagine Sisyphus happy." Albert Camus - "The innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may ​do well under the new." Nicolo Machiavelli -"Things that are too complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple." Mikhail Kalashnikov

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by josephpeel View Post
      yeah, Dynamo;

      There are a few good programs like BIMLink but to do something specificaly linked to datasheets in the way you want to you will probably need the flexibility of a programming language, or dynamo if youre a "programmer who doesnt know any programming languages" like me...
      i was thinking dynamo, but I wouldnt know where to start.

      Comment


        #4
        It's surprisingly newbie friendly. Just start with a basic DYN and start adding stuff to it. The cool thing is that it's running IN your revit model, so you're getting real-time feedback as to if something works or not. So the pace of trial-and-error learning is very fast. I don't know any programing languages and I got sucked into learning it like it was a fun puzzle.

        EDIT: The search function at the top of the toolbar is very good as well. When I was getting started, I would just type various words for what I was trying to do into the search and find the node I needed.
        Last edited by Necro99; August 27, 2017, 12:40 PM.

        Comment


          #5
          I have created this, but i want the outputed data into an existing excel file/tab?? not sure how to do that.

          Attached Files

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by nick_h View Post
            anyone know of any programs that could do this? or how do it
            Though seduced by Dynamo's power, I'm going to buck the trend again and say you have the tool(s) already.

            Specifically, Excel. One imagines you might, since you have Excel, Access also? Bank that for later maybe...

            Let's start with understanding which "program" is it you got? An addin. I imagine? There are so many, that all do things marginally differently, so we really need to know which. I've tested many of the free Revit/Excel push/pull apps - and have settled (for the time being) on BIMone's one. Not that we use it for any of our production steps - only populating... but bear with me here.

            First, you will need a translation method of some means - that will take your output(s) from Revit, mix them up a bit, then spit them out again, and into your standard office templates.

            Now for the first interjection; Consider that your current office templates might not be suited to the data input you are going to generate from Revit. To help us really help you, we would need to understand a little about their underlying structure and ultimate output. Do they have user-entered fields? Do they work with tables, lookups, references and/or ranges of any kind? Do they link to data sources of any other kind? Are they interactive? Do they auto-populate particular document properties? etc.... If we are to presume it's a fairly rudimentary

            Start by using the addin (or, as I do, just use the native Revit to .txt) to generate your output. If opting for the manual option, (but also with some of the addins) make sure you are not sending out any totals, titles, column groupings or any formatting of numerical values. Consider the value of having Revit do calculations and concatenations also, if you plan to use Excel to do the same later - ideally you only send values when mixing with data.

            In a blank Excel, link to the file (.xls, .xlsx or .txt depending on above) and set up a data connection. Note, certain versions of Excel have played silly with maintaining connections based on certain properties when defining the link, including, frustratingly, "Refresh on opening file" so check that off - it means you have to manually refresh, but having the elective choice actually adds value. I opt for connection-only these days, but you might like to opt for placing the table (from the link) into a worksheet to get things started - just be sure to add to the link to the data model.

            Now in a new worksheet, start your harvesting. Having appraised your standard company templates you should have by now identified key values. We need an example... Forgive me, I'm going to try my best with MEP terms! So let's imagine you're compiling a pipework package and need:
            Pipe Lengths by Type, Type properties of all Pipes, Pipe Lengths by System, Pipe Fittings by Type, Pipe fittings per level...
            all in a report.
            Previously users queried the length of CAD polylines of drawn pipework (?) then entered the values manually into an Excel field, whilst someone else had worked out how to export a block count to a table in Excel so those values were =sum results of a kind.
            We essentially need to use your 'intermediary workbook' to find those values in/across the exported data contained in your linked output from Revit.

            =INDEX ( array ,*MATCH formula ) will be your new friend - amongst =sumif =countif and alike formula. Pivot tables are another great way to re-shape Revit data output - and can themselves become a visually appealing report device for documentation. But nonetheless, we persevere - there may simply be too much invested in the company templates to veer too far away at this time.

            So after some natty formula use to trawl your tables for interesting totals, percentages, and such...

            We define named references, either to cell references, or formula themselves, to collect your (now automated) values for replacing the manual/other-entry fields of your company template - in which we replace the fields where user's entered stuff manually with linked paths to said named references of your 'intermediary workbook'.

            That deals with output.

            Returning values brings me to my second interjection: I feel it generally remiss to manipulate data post-extraction from source when considering documentation - so I don't think I want to suggest how you would make your report bi-directional. That and it'd be complicated! and I'm scared I've already crossed into blogpost/manual territory! :crazy:

            I would advise any attempt at bi-directionality be done away from documentation. Either be it Dynamo or as we do with "working schedules" inside Revit (that we do spit in and out using BIMone)


            But given what we've accomplished already, we can pursue Excel further.

            Your 'intermediary workbook', aside from collecting and sending out the data again, can also be used as an editor.

            When we elected to dump a (linked) copy of the table into a worksheet, we were given immediate access to edit the parameter values directly. Noting that some Revit parameters are system restricted, one could edit the values in the table by however means (filtering selections,copy/pasting, group-dragging values,find-and-replace,etc) then return the values in export to the overwrite the source - which your addin could then read as an input. This can get complicated. Most of the Revit addins generate their own columns and structures amongst the output data (so they can read it back) so you can easily trip up here when attempting to push Excel-edits back into a pre-formatted .xls... I have found it "less" painful to use the raw .txt outputs from Revit - but having never figured out how to adjust the .txt output from Excel - I've had to work the other way round and set Revit's export to emulate Excel's .txt formatting:
            field delimiter ,
            text qualifier (none)
            Which isn't particularly elegant - and still won't enable any means for the "return" of values that are technically products of collated information (i.e. you couldn't edit and push back "the total length of a piping system" into any one value of your source data)



            OMG. I just word counted this. :hide:

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by snowyweston View Post
              Though seduced by Dynamo's power, I'm going to buck the trend again and say you have the tool(s) already.

              Specifically, Excel. One imagines you might, since you have Excel, Access also? Bank that for later maybe...

              Let's start with understanding which "program" is it you got? An addin. I imagine? There are so many, that all do things marginally differently, so we really need to know which. I've tested many of the free Revit/Excel push/pull apps - and have settled (for the time being) on BIMone's one. Not that we use it for any of our production steps - only populating... but bear with me here.

              First, you will need a translation method of some means - that will take your output(s) from Revit, mix them up a bit, then spit them out again, and into your standard office templates.

              Now for the first interjection; Consider that your current office templates might not be suited to the data input you are going to generate from Revit. To help us really help you, we would need to understand a little about their underlying structure and ultimate output. Do they have user-entered fields? Do they work with tables, lookups, references and/or ranges of any kind? Do they link to data sources of any other kind? Are they interactive? Do they auto-populate particular document properties? etc.... If we are to presume it's a fairly rudimentary

              Start by using the addin (or, as I do, just use the native Revit to .txt) to generate your output. If opting for the manual option, (but also with some of the addins) make sure you are not sending out any totals, titles, column groupings or any formatting of numerical values. Consider the value of having Revit do calculations and concatenations also, if you plan to use Excel to do the same later - ideally you only send values when mixing with data.

              In a blank Excel, link to the file (.xls, .xlsx or .txt depending on above) and set up a data connection. Note, certain versions of Excel have played silly with maintaining connections based on certain properties when defining the link, including, frustratingly, "Refresh on opening file" so check that off - it means you have to manually refresh, but having the elective choice actually adds value. I opt for connection-only these days, but you might like to opt for placing the table (from the link) into a worksheet to get things started - just be sure to add to the link to the data model.

              Now in a new worksheet, start your harvesting. Having appraised your standard company templates you should have by now identified key values. We need an example... Forgive me, I'm going to try my best with MEP terms! So let's imagine you're compiling a pipework package and need:
              Pipe Lengths by Type, Type properties of all Pipes, Pipe Lengths by System, Pipe Fittings by Type, Pipe fittings per level...
              all in a report.
              Previously users queried the length of CAD polylines of drawn pipework (?) then entered the values manually into an Excel field, whilst someone else had worked out how to export a block count to a table in Excel so those values were =sum results of a kind.
              We essentially need to use your 'intermediary workbook' to find those values in/across the exported data contained in your linked output from Revit.

              =INDEX ( array ,*MATCH formula ) will be your new friend - amongst =sumif =countif and alike formula. Pivot tables are another great way to re-shape Revit data output - and can themselves become a visually appealing report device for documentation. But nonetheless, we persevere - there may simply be too much invested in the company templates to veer too far away at this time.

              So after some natty formula use to trawl your tables for interesting totals, percentages, and such...

              We define named references, either to cell references, or formula themselves, to collect your (now automated) values for replacing the manual/other-entry fields of your company template - in which we replace the fields where user's entered stuff manually with linked paths to said named references of your 'intermediary workbook'.

              That deals with output.

              Returning values brings me to my second interjection: I feel it generally remiss to manipulate data post-extraction from source when considering documentation - so I don't think I want to suggest how you would make your report bi-directional. That and it'd be complicated! and I'm scared I've already crossed into blogpost/manual territory! :crazy:

              I would advise any attempt at bi-directionality be done away from documentation. Either be it Dynamo or as we do with "working schedules" inside Revit (that we do spit in and out using BIMone)


              But given what we've accomplished already, we can pursue Excel further.

              Your 'intermediary workbook', aside from collecting and sending out the data again, can also be used as an editor.

              When we elected to dump a (linked) copy of the table into a worksheet, we were given immediate access to edit the parameter values directly. Noting that some Revit parameters are system restricted, one could edit the values in the table by however means (filtering selections,copy/pasting, group-dragging values,find-and-replace,etc) then return the values in export to the overwrite the source - which your addin could then read as an input. This can get complicated. Most of the Revit addins generate their own columns and structures amongst the output data (so they can read it back) so you can easily trip up here when attempting to push Excel-edits back into a pre-formatted .xls... I have found it "less" painful to use the raw .txt outputs from Revit - but having never figured out how to adjust the .txt output from Excel - I've had to work the other way round and set Revit's export to emulate Excel's .txt formatting:
              field delimiter ,
              text qualifier (none)
              Which isn't particularly elegant - and still won't enable any means for the "return" of values that are technically products of collated information (i.e. you couldn't edit and push back "the total length of a piping system" into any one value of your source data)



              OMG. I just word counted this. :hide:

              WOAH! thanks for the reply snowy, I will have to go through this again and re-digest it ha! we do use a program that spits out the schedules easy enough into excel and my first thought was if there was a way of just doing something excel, but my excel skills are very limited.

              I have attached 2 schedules the revit exported revit schedule and our company standard excel schedule. all the parameters/heading from the revit schedule match the standard schedule its just trying to get the data into I dont know how to.?
              Attached Files

              Comment


                #8
                v.busy today so can't look too deep at this Nick, but first/quick observations:

                1. Note in the export the <ElementID> column? That's one of the addin-added fields (extracted from Revit nonetheless)
                2. The export has also sent out the schedule title - and formatting of on the columns (i.e. "0 W") = when you really need that value to just be 0
                3. The export has sent total/blank rows out (see excel row 56)
                4. The export has sent two schedules out, to two distinct worksheets
                5. Your company template is "tabular" of sorts, but suffers from visual "preening" (i.e. break-row for "Ground Level") - which are slightly problematic - consider the value of having level information "in-line" as per...


                I attach a quick hack of the output, showing how (if it the data were a table) a pivot can easily be crafted to look very much like your template...
                Attached Files

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by snowyweston View Post
                  v.busy today so can't look too deep at this Nick, but first/quick observations:

                  1. Note in the export the <ElementID> column? That's one of the addin-added fields (extracted from Revit nonetheless)
                  2. The export has also sent out the schedule title - and formatting of on the columns (i.e. "0 W") = when you really need that value to just be 0
                  3. The export has sent total/blank rows out (see excel row 56)
                  4. The export has sent two schedules out, to two distinct worksheets
                  5. Your company template is "tabular" of sorts, but suffers from visual "preening" (i.e. break-row for "Ground Level") - which are slightly problematic - consider the value of having level information "in-line" as per...


                  I attach a quick hack of the output, showing how (if it the data were a table) a pivot can easily be crafted to look very much like your template...

                  I am a bit confused with this, how does this input the info into our standard excel sheet, I think you are using a later version of excel so dont know if its opening wrong.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by nick_h View Post
                    I am a bit confused with this, how does this input the info into our standard excel sheet
                    It doesn't. It was a sleight at your template... as in, there's nothing in your template (presently) that wouldn't benefit from a workflow rethink.

                    Comment

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