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    Room Bounding?

    I don't normally deal with modeling floors, ceilings, or roofs but am doing some work for a Contractor creating areas for stucco soffits so he can tell the stud framer where to install studs. I notice when creating any of the objects there is a parameter called Room Bounding. Doing a little research I see that having the area of the created object Room Bounding creates a boundary that is used to compute the area or volume of the room. Sounds reasonable, but why is it that the parameters for Perimeter, Area, and Volume are available regardless of whether the floor, ceiling, or roof was created as Room Bounding or not. I'm curious if there is some further value to having my soffits, created using Ceilings, be Room Bounding instead of not. More of a curiosity question than anything else.
    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

    #2
    "Room bounding" is used when you want to place, schedule and tag rooms. If you don't need rooms, the walls, ceilings and floors need not be "room bounding".

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      #3
      Originally posted by cganiere View Post
      "Room bounding" is used when you want to place, schedule and tag rooms. If you don't need rooms, the walls, ceilings and floors need not be "room bounding".
      hmm, thanks for that my fellow Californian . I can see that applying to ceilings but how would one create a room with a floor or a roof? One for every room you need? Again, just idle curiosity here
      I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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        #4
        Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
        .. but why is it that the parameters for Perimeter, Area, and Volume are available regardless of whether the floor, ceiling, or roof was created as Room Bounding or not. ..
        The room still has a lower and upper limit - defined under the room properties itself.
        roomlimits.PNG
        All that happens if ceilings/floors are room bounding is that if they are within those limits then the extent of the room gets cut back and therefore the volume can be more exact (especially for sloping ceilings etc). You can see this in action if you take a section through the room.
        Last edited by DaveP; August 17, 2017, 02:03 PM. Reason: fixed quote
        Alex Page
        RevitWorks Ltd
        Check out our Door Factory, the door maker add-in for Revit

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          #5
          Floors, Ceilings and Roofs being Room Bounding don't really mean a whole lot to us Architects, but the HVAC guys use them (or should) to get the volume of the Rooms for their Air Exchange calculations.
          Dave Plumb
          BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

          CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

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            #6
            thanks all, seems I need not worry about Room Bounding. Something new in Revit every day
            I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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