Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Toposurface is above my roof!!!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Toposurface is above my roof!!!

    Hello everyone,

    my project is ready but toposurface that has absolute elevation of all points = 0'-0' is 200 feet above my building what i have to do?

    I have played with survey and base points many hours and no success!

    #2
    You can go to an elevation view (any will do) and Under the manage tab go to the project placement category in the ribbon and look for "coordinates" then click on the little Arrow and bring up "specify coordinates at point" now click on your level 0 and set your elevation to 200 feet. This will move your entire project up to the absolute level and it will match your topo surface

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Karalon10 View Post
      You can go to an elevation view (any will do) and Under the manage tab go to the project placement category in the ribbon and look for "coordinates" then click on the little Arrow and bring up "specify coordinates at point" now click on your level 0 and set your elevation to 200 feet. This will move your entire project up to the absolute level and it will match your topo surface
      And then select your topo and "move" it down 200 feet.

      Comment


        #4
        no you wont need to move your topo as it is already at the correct absolute level

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Karalon10 View Post
          no you wont need to move your topo as it is already at the correct absolute level
          Well, that really depends on where he's at, doesn't it? Is he in an Architectural Environment, or a Civil Environment? Sounds like he's created a topo surface in the same project as his structure. In that case, move the topo down. Or, link your building into the site plan via shared coordinates.

          Comment


            #6
            no because topo is drawn at absolute, in all cases.

            if you move the topo down, you are changing all of your spot elevation values.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Karalon10 View Post
              no because topo is drawn at absolute, in all cases.

              if you move the topo down, you are changing all of your spot elevation values.
              We're going to have to agree to disagree on this one.

              Comment


                #8
                In residential work, I will almost always model the topography and the building at absolute level which is provided to us from the land survey.

                We will at the same time want to display the proposed floor level as zero in the project (and all other levels in the project as relative to this level), as this is easier for the carpenter / builder on site.

                We have set up a spot level to report absolute level within our template file.

                Once we have the land survey data, we place a spot level on the proposed ground floor level line and then move the levels up to match the floor level height which the land surveyor provided.

                To change our project level back to report the ground floor as zero.

                In an elevation or section view - Manage - Drop down button of Coordinate - Select Specify coordinates at a point. Hover the mouse near the end of the proposed ground floor level line - a dot will appear. Select the dot. In the dialog box which then appears change the elevation to whatever number is displayed to zero - hit OK.

                In this way you can report the absolute height of a model element using the spot elevation tool while having the construction height levels displayed as calculated above zero.
                Ian Kidston
                http://allextensions.com.au

                Comment


                  #9
                  I’m sorry, but I’ve been in light frame/residential, on the Architectural side, for over 30 years and we have never moved our “levels up to match the floor level height which the land surveyor provided.” Civil doesn’t provide us with floor levels. Nor do we provide them with pad heights. We do not orient the site to the building – we orient the building to the site (via linking and shared coordinates in Revit). Finish floor level is always Zero, which is typically eight inches above grade per code (NorCal) – regardless of whether that top of grade is at sea level, foothill level or mountain level.

                  That being said, if the author of this thread has placed his topography in the same environment as his building, and is concerned about maintaining absolute elevations, I would suggest that he break up the file: one for Architectural and one for Civil, rather than trying to manage the disciplines together in the same project – which, obviously, is already becoming a headache for him.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Barth View Post
                    I’m sorry, but I’ve been in light frame/residential, on the Architectural side, for over 30 years and we have never moved our “levels up to match the floor level height which the land surveyor provided.” Civil doesn’t provide us with floor levels. Nor do we provide them with pad heights. We do not orient the site to the building – we orient the building to the site (via linking and shared coordinates in Revit). Finish floor level is always Zero, which is typically eight inches above grade per code (NorCal) – regardless of whether that top of grade is at sea level, foothill level or mountain level.

                    That being said, if the author of this thread has placed his topography in the same environment as his building, and is concerned about maintaining absolute elevations, I would suggest that he break up the file: one for Architectural and one for Civil, rather than trying to manage the disciplines together in the same project – which, obviously, is already becoming a headache for him.
                    you've been using Revit for over 30 years???

                    What I'm wondering is if we all model topography in the same way, this could be the root of all our differences. For example, when we get the survey CAD drawing it usually contains 3D information including the elevation of contour lines. From these contours floating out in space we mesh together a terrain using the 'Create from Import Tool'. Depending on what level you first imported the CAD survey on, the topography created will be at actual height above that level. In this case we also move our topography down so that our T.O.F.F level is aligned to the terrain (and not 200' or so feet below').

                    But if Ian models his topography not using the 'Create from Import' tool then he wouldn't need to do that...

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X