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    Family Detail achievable

    Hi Everyone,

    First time poster. I have a client that is ready to take their workflow into Revit if possible. They design car dealerships and have a ton of Panel details (the panels that wrap around the dealership)

    So, how much detail can a Revit family have? I attached an image of a detail between two panels. This detail is needed so that their installers can correctly install on site. They have a few dozen different details like this that would be inserted between panels.

    Is this something that Revit families should be used for? They have a goal to build up a library of all their panel types down to the level of detail shown. As a stretch goal, they also want to eventually get a material schedule from this in order to know how much of everything to order (mainly screws, panel material)

    Any guidance is appreciated!
    Attached Files

    #2
    LOL! I've got all of those ACM panel details done already so, yes that LOD can be achieved with a detail family. To be clear though, you do not want to model panels to this LOD as it's not useful for any purpose. Create your panel walls with Revit curtain walls or generic models and detail on drafting views. I'm not in the office yet but I'll post a sample when I get there

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

    Edit: this is a current project, happens to be Elward ACM, modeled as curtain wall and detailed via drafting views
    Last edited by Dave Jones; June 24, 2017, 02:44 PM.
    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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      #3
      Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
      LOL! I've got all of those ACM panel details done already so, yes that LOD can be achieved with a detail family. To be clear though, you do not want to model panels to this LOD as it's not useful for any purpose.
      Dumb question that I've probably asked before: How do you get around the stupid "Line segment is too small" (<3/32" isn't it?) issue that Revit has?
      Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


      chad
      BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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        #4
        Originally posted by cellophane View Post
        Dumb question that I've probably asked before: How do you get around the stupid "Line segment is too small" (<3/32" isn't it?) issue that Revit has?
        If I told you then I'd have to kill you

        Seriously, sometimes you just can't get around the Line to Short warning but I've figured out four ways to make it better, sort of:
        1. Instead of drawing a short line from point A to point B draw the line long past point B and use Trim to make the short line. That works a lot of times even when you can't directly make the short line.
        2. Sometimes if #2 doesn't work, Align will work using the same initial longer line method.
        3. Scale the detail component x10, make your lines, then scale it back down again.
        4. As a last resort I cheat. Instead of drawing a line from point A to point B to point C, I draw the line from point A to point C. Because I use this method for the creation of detail components, mostly aluminum extrusions, they are not accurately created. But, for my purposes they are graphically correct. I have a waiver in my project proposal that says in Big Letters "don't use any CAD exports for extrusion die drawings" plus a bunch of other "don't do this" stuff related to detail components.

        Then after all of trying methods #1 thru #3 Revit sometimes just won't do it making me use method #1. As far as the line length limitation I've heard that is is 3/64" (0.046875") but I regularly create lines that are 0.040" long as that is a standard thickness for aluminum brake shape flashings, closures, splices, etc. Then sometimes Revit won't let me create a 3/32" line. Sort of depends on what mood Revit is in at the moment I think
        I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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          #5
          I thought it was 1/32" in length?


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          Greg McDowell Jr
          about.me/GMcDowellJr

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            #6
            Originally posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
            I thought it was 1/32" in length?


            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
            sometimes...I just made a DL in a 1/4" scale view at 0.0300" long, which is less than 1/32". Other times in different view scales Revit has trouble with lines longer than that. Matter of fact in that same view that I made the 0.03" line I tried making a perpendicular line to try to trim the short line shorter and got the line to short error. The second line was 0.071" long so who knows what Revit is thinking. I think that zoom factor has something to do with it...

            so much for 1/32", how's this? I did that with the Trim trick

            edit: and interestingly the small radii in the upper left corner is 0.014R
            Last edited by Dave Jones; June 25, 2017, 08:10 PM.
            I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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              #7
              While I have been able to make some short lines in detail components, I've never been able to convert these to 3D geometry. For example, you can make a profile family with very short lines, but you will be unable to make a sweep with that profile. Something to think about if you're after super detailed geometry.

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                #8
                Originally posted by cellophane View Post
                Dumb question that I've probably asked before: How do you get around the stupid "Line segment is too small" (<3/32" isn't it?) issue that Revit has?
                I faked the drafting error with the understanding that Nobody Cares (TM). You can hardly see 1/32" on the sheets when printed unless it is 1:1. They made the 1/32" limit for a reason. The guys in the field have a hard enough time getting to the quarter inch. A full inch if you're talking concrete guys. 1/32" is getting too caught up in the minute details.

                Then there is the old joke "any similarity between the drawings and what they built is purely coincidental". Good luck getting the 1/32" done in the field.
                ​My ID was stolen. Now I'm only called Dav

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
                  If I told you then I'd have to kill you

                  Seriously, sometimes you just can't get around the Line to Short warning but I've figured out four ways to make it better, sort of:
                  1. Instead of drawing a short line from point A to point B draw the line long past point B and use Trim to make the short line. That works a lot of times even when you can't directly make the short line.
                  2. Sometimes if #2 doesn't work, Align will work using the same initial longer line method.
                  3. Scale the detail component x10, make your lines, then scale it back down again.
                  4. As a last resort I cheat. Instead of drawing a line from point A to point B to point C, I draw the line from point A to point C. Because I use this method for the creation of detail components, mostly aluminum extrusions, they are not accurately created. But, for my purposes they are graphically correct. I have a waiver in my project proposal that says in Big Letters "don't use any CAD exports for extrusion die drawings" plus a bunch of other "don't do this" stuff related to detail components.

                  Then after all of trying methods #1 thru #3 Revit sometimes just won't do it making me use method #1. As far as the line length limitation I've heard that is is 3/64" (0.046875") but I regularly create lines that are 0.040" long as that is a standard thickness for aluminum brake shape flashings, closures, splices, etc. Then sometimes Revit won't let me create a 3/32" line. Sort of depends on what mood Revit is in at the moment I think
                  I've used option 3 & 4 a number of times. I'll have to mess around with 1 & 2 some next time I'm making something small like that.

                  Thanks!
                  Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                  chad
                  BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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