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How long to build a usable model by a competent Revit user?

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    How long to build a usable model by a competent Revit user?

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    I'm a Senior CAD Technician with 25yrs experience. Just caught the end of drawings boards, then onto AutoCAD and SketchUp. Realised I couldn't avoid the Revit tide any further and have recently been plugging away and slowly getting there. I see all the benefits but it's just so cumbersome at times that it makes creating the simplest of things a huge undertaking, at the moment at least.
    I was recently asked to join a small practice and agreed to on the condition that we started using Revit (which they have licences for) on all projects going forward. They've been using AutoCAD for a decade.
    As a practice we're trying to work out if it's economic long term to use Revit on all projects (including domestic) once we're all fully trained and up to speed on Revit or whether sticking with AutoCAD would be better. We're prepared to take the financial hit in the short to medium term to allow us all the time to get fluent with Revit but, as always, it boils down to available fee and whether it will stretch far enough to build and utilise a Revit model in the future by a competent Revit user.
    What I'd like to know is roughly how long it would take to create a usable (accurate and useful) Revit model for a particular example project (I can post up the CAD file) by someone who is well trained and competent with Revit. I'd simply like a rough idea of the number of days it would take to draw up the measured survey to create the existing set then the proposed set. We can then compare this with the time taken to run the project with just AutoCAD.
    Any help from anyone would be very much appreciated.

    Last edited by Munkholm; June 12, 2017, 07:05 AM.

    #2
    Please don't post in green, it's really hard to read IMO. In regard to your post, I don't think that there is a definite answer that will give you a project completion comparison between Acad and Revit. And frankly, why does it matter? You have obviously seen the writing on the wall so rather than wasting time trying to compare two completely different software programs for output, just get on with it. Revit is the future, AutoCAD is fading into the sunset. I also started on the boards, used AutoCAD for over 25 years, and have now been using Revit for almost 8 years. It took me a couple of years to become mildly proficient with Revit and about the same amount of time to get the Acad mentality behind me. The benefits to be derived from an accurate and complete Revit model will blow the doors off of any Acad unintelligent 2D lines and blocks. That's my Saturday $0.02 USD
    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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      #3
      Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
      I also started on the boards, used AutoCAD for over 25 years, and have now been using Revit for almost 8 years. It took me a couple of years to become mildly proficient with Revit and about the same amount of time to get the Acad mentality behind me. The benefits to be derived from an accurate and complete Revit model will blow the doors off of any Acad unintelligent 2D lines and blocks. That's my Saturday $0.02 USD
      Ditto that; I also started on the boards, used AutoCAD for over 15 years, and have now been using Revit for 10 years.

      There is a long learning curve. You do have to spend time overcoming that. But the benefits are immense; my own reckoning over the years is that it's been a 10X productivity enhancer; either doing the same with 10X less labour, or doing it faster with the same labour, etc., etc.

      Works for a single practitioner that's working on their own increasing their productivity to a large team getting a very well coordinated set of drawings out.
      Kamran Mirza
      Chartered Architect RIBA, ARB, PCATP

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        #4
        Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
        Please don't post in green, it's really hard to read IMO. In regard to your post, I don't think that there is a definite answer that will give you a project completion comparison between Acad and Revit. And frankly, why does it matter? You have obviously seen the writing on the wall so rather than wasting time trying to compare two completely different software programs for output, just get on with it. Revit is the future, AutoCAD is fading into the sunset. I also started on the boards, used AutoCAD for over 25 years, and have now been using Revit for almost 8 years. It took me a couple of years to become mildly proficient with Revit and about the same amount of time to get the Acad mentality behind me. The benefits to be derived from an accurate and complete Revit model will blow the doors off of any Acad unintelligent 2D lines and blocks. That's my Saturday $0.02 USD
        Great info and reassurance thanks. Not sure how I posted in green, this was totally unintentional. I posted from a tablet through Chrome on a poor data connection (in Cornwall) so this may have been the reason.

        Originally posted by kamranmirza View Post
        Ditto that; I also started on the boards, used AutoCAD for over 15 years, and have now been using Revit for 10 years.

        There is a long learning curve. You do have to spend time overcoming that. But the benefits are immense; my own reckoning over the years is that it's been a 10X productivity enhancer; either doing the same with 10X less labour, or doing it faster with the same labour, etc., etc.

        Works for a single practitioner that's working on their own increasing their productivity to a large team getting a very well coordinated set of drawings out.
        Again, thanks for the info. I like the sound of 10x less labour. Our job is time consuming enough as it is. Anything that will get me there is worth investing time in.

        You've both obviously run a similar race to me previously but have made the full-time leap to Revit. I see the advantages but just need to stick with it through the pain and push on through to get to a place of productivity.

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          #5
          If you're looking to reduce your delivery time, I wouldn't hold my breath. You'll still want more than you'll have or be given. What you will notice is you'll need less overtime to get there! Eventually, you may also realize you can put fewer people on your projects which is, I think, better than turning the project in early. My former office was "better" at Revit than my current, and the number of staff per project reflected that by quite a bit. An old study, like 10+ years, commissioned by Autodesk, I believe, demonstrated a 20% reduction in time. Maybe high, but at even half that, it's a game changer.


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          Greg McDowell Jr
          about.me/GMcDowellJr

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            #6
            Originally posted by ju_jigsaw View Post
            Great info and reassurance thanks. Not sure how I posted in green, this was totally unintentional. I posted from a tablet through Chrome on a poor data connection (in Cornwall) so this may have been the reason.
            yeah, that was rather strange. I've been in this forum since 2011 and had never seen a whole post in color before ??
            I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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              #7
              I'm guessing ju must have had his text on the CRNWLL layer. :hide:
              Motorbike riding is one long bezier curve

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