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Domestic Hot Water Return Flow Rate

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    Domestic Hot Water Return Flow Rate

    Does anyone know if Revit is capable of calculating the flow rate and pressure drop for a domestic hot water return system?

    What is the best way to do this?

    #2
    If you want to size pipes and get the total pressure drop based on Flow it is better to use a Hydronic Return system type for the hot water return.

    I guess that each location where the return is connected to the warm water supply there will be a recirculation flow rate, that you can add using an endcap/plumbing fixture that has a Hydronic Return connector and a flow parameter you can fill in.
    "One must imagine Sisyphus happy." Albert Camus - "The innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may ​do well under the new." Nicolo Machiavelli -"Things that are too complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple." Mikhail Kalashnikov

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      #3
      Just curious, why would domestic hot water return have to use the Hydronic Return Type?

      Our Recirc system is part of the Domestic Hot Water Type, but then I don't really mess with domestic water fixture units in Revit. I know how it works, but our plumbing systems are usually so simple (offices are 90% of what we do) that it's just not worth the time and effort to get it working. I do use it on Storm Water and hydronic piping systems, though. And if we ever did something huge like a hospital or high-density residential building I would definitely use it.

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        #4
        Well for recirc there will be a constant flow, not intermittent flow with a redundancy factor (Fixture units method). Hydronic Return system just calculates Flow.
        You could calculate what the flow should be with a heat loss calc in a schedule, for the total length, diameter, and temp difference of the hot water piping. Then the recirculation flow needs to be enough to match that heat loss, like the flow for a radiator.

        I have done a lot with piping calcs in revit because we have to calculate to different standards (In netherlands) and I think it is worth the effort to set it up.
        The biggest advantage is that you dont need to go around checking and changing pipe sizes when things have been changed. Just set the end fixture/terminal families correctly and then tab-select everything and trust in power of re-calculation...
        Also Pipe Accessories do resize correctly when you use the pipe sizing calc, but not when you change the pipes manually, so that saves some time.
        "One must imagine Sisyphus happy." Albert Camus - "The innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may ​do well under the new." Nicolo Machiavelli -"Things that are too complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple." Mikhail Kalashnikov

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          #5
          i am also trying to get the calculations to work for domestic pipework.

          just adding end caps as the hot and cold taps with added connectors for fixture units (not sure if I'm doing it correctly) my hot water return is classed as domestic hot water.

          I have added a mixing valve and it seems to mess things up. I would also like to get the flow to read correctly but not sure again if im doing it correctly.

          see the attached snap shot.

          CHEERS

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