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Combined window and door schedule using curtain panels

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    Combined window and door schedule using curtain panels

    So i know this is something that has probably been asked a million times, but I'm hoping someone can give me an answer in plain English as to whether there is a way to combine windows and doors into a schedule with the said objects being created using curtain walls with panels replaced for doors, awning windows etc. And please, no BIM jargon. I've been googling for about 2 hrs now and experimenting with different methods and I'm at my wits end. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

    #2
    Sure, you can get it all in one schedule using curtain walls and curtain panels.

    And what a freaking mistake it will be, to do it. Could tell you why, but I guess that would count as "BIM jargon."

    Good luck with it!

    Sent from my Phablet. Please excuse typos... and bad ideas.

    Aaron Maller
    Director
    Parallax Team, Inc.
    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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      #3
      Well Sir, in this case I'm willing to make an exception. Revit seems to have turned drawing into programming, gets me a bit heated under the collar when something that is usually so simple to achieve is made difficult by having to know what parameters and filters etc etc etc...

      So please tell me why this would be a mistake? Cheers.

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        #4
        Originally posted by aaronsmith0707 View Post
        Revit seems to have turned drawing into programming
        Drawing into Virtual building modelling would be more accurate...and it's freakin awesome.

        It does however, require a certain amount of patients while you learn the software.

        When you say "normally so simple to achieve", you mean in another modelling software or drafting software?
        7

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          #5
          What do you mean by drawing into virtual building modelling?

          And I'm talking about non parametric software, AutoCAD or even hand drafting for that matter. No need for an IT degree to produce quality drawings.

          I appreciate the convenience in producing the models for presentation purposes and having changes translated throughout plans, elevations etc. I just feel its over complicated in a lot of areas. And i know all those seasoned Revit users/BIMers will be like 'its super easy!' but mot everyone has a passion for the technical knowledge required when it gets down to the nitty gritty.

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            #6
            Originally posted by aaronsmith0707 View Post
            What do you mean by drawing into virtual building modelling?

            And I'm talking about non parametric software, AutoCAD or even hand drafting for that matter. No need for an IT degree to produce quality drawings.

            I appreciate the convenience in producing the models for presentation purposes and having changes translated throughout plans, elevations etc. I just feel its over complicated in a lot of areas. And i know all those seasoned Revit users/BIMers will be like 'its super easy!' but mot everyone has a passion for the technical knowledge required when it gets down to the nitty gritty.
            Make your own curtain panels as doors and windows, pretty easy.
            Maybe stick with autocad or hand drawings if you find that easier? :shrugs:
            Last edited by elton williams; May 30, 2017, 08:58 AM.
            There are no stupid questions, only stupid people

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              #7
              guys are being a bit short with you...

              the answer as suggested was yes you can insert doors and Windows into your curtain walls but its a bad idea (for BIM'y reasons) especially if you want to get schedules out then this is certainly a BIM'y reason not to do that workflow.

              Eltons answer was that you can model a curtain wall panel family and make it look like a door or a window. But again, for reasons stated above, it's the same workflow that I think most here will recommend against - although you certainly can do it and the model will look just fine, its just a bad way to do it because you are making your life harder further down the chain of data extraction (BIM'y reasons)

              Yes the line is blurring between drafter now, no longer just producing drawings but this is why they get called modelers now, because its not just about drawing you are literally constructing (in a virtual environment) the building before it is built. This complicates life for modelers, but gives very reliable results when it comes to extracting the data from that model because, it is an exact replica of what will (theoretically) be built. Yes I know there are more often than not problems on site etc but we virtually constructed it away from those issues.

              Basically as contracts are heading now in the next several years it will be adapt to the new generation of software or go the way of the dinosaur (in my opinion). Governments are demanding "BIM" for all of their infrastructre projects so sooner or later if you want to be on the gravy train you need to adapt.

              This is also another problem, is that the old "draftsman" skills might get lost in the process. I think this just comes down to good mentoring. There is more to running a project as a lead drafter than just banging out drawings, you need to manage the priority of what to produce, know all the standards both drawing and local building standards (and now modeling standards, and bim standards if this is applicapable in your area) I think draftsman are well Under-appreciated in the field but thats a personal gripe. Drafting as you know isn't just about pulling a line from one end of the page to another and drawing plans, and now "BIM" is just another tool to add to the toolbox. You already know how to do your job, the software is literally just a tool to make your life more productive, you should really not get too caught up in the jargon. What you want is a "super-user" in your organisation, someone that is passionate about it, call them your internal bim coordinator, let them do all the research and study (but I guarantee they will be paid more than you in the coming 5 to 10 years if they are any good)

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                #8
                Originally posted by aaronsmith0707 View Post
                And I'm talking about non parametric software, AutoCAD or even hand drafting for that matter. No need for an IT degree to produce quality drawings.... I just feel its over complicated in a lot of areas. And i know all those seasoned Revit users/BIMers will be like 'its super easy!' but mot everyone has a passion for the technical knowledge required when it gets down to the nitty gritty.
                Just to clear the record: I have a degree in architecture. NO computer programming. In fact... Programming was the one course I failed between high school and college.

                I've been working with architects and engineers alike for over a decade, and (sadly) you can find architects broken up in to two camps:

                1. ones who see that BIM will take more time to get good at (that will then pay extreme efficiency rewards and also benefit the entire downstream industry)

                2. those with a chip on their shoulder because they just want to "do what they always do and have it look how it always looks."

                One of these groups is bound to succeed, hence it's worth investing time to set them on the right course. The other is flippant and generally dismissive towards the deal logic in the processes, hence it's more economical to just be flippant back, than to try teaching them.

                Sent from my Phablet. Please excuse typos... and bad ideas.

                Aaron Maller
                Director
                Parallax Team, Inc.
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by aaronsmith0707 View Post
                  And i know all those seasoned Revit users/BIMers will be like 'its super easy!' but mot everyone has a passion for the technical knowledge required when it gets down to the nitty gritty.
                  ??you don't have a passion for "technical knowledge" and yet you embark on the Revit journey. That makes no sense. I have no technical training. Never had the time or money to go to college, went to work and was on my own when I was 15 years old. I just made a multi category schedule that included all of the curtain panels, doors, operable vent windows, louvers in my project. I filtered them with an addition to the built in Comment parameter like "schedule me". Took 20 seconds and the schedule includes around 1500 items with counts, widths, heights, descriptions, etc. I don't believe that to be technical knowledge, that's knowing how to use the tool that is in front of you. The more you learn about Revit the more it becomes useful for things that you need to get done. I started on "the boards" in '69, used AutoCAD for 25 years, and now Revit for 7 years. I wouldn't go backwards for anything!
                  I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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                    #10
                    aaronsmith; I think you'll find that most people here on RFO will be happy to help you, but will often question what you are trying to accomplish.
                    In other words, we'll try yo help you do it right. We probably won't help you do something inefficiently.
                    We've all been through the learning curve ourselves and, rather than lead you down a road you're going to regret later (because we have), we try to find a better way to get you to your goal.
                    We often find that people at the beginning of the learning curve will latch on to some poor modeling practice and force everything into that process.
                    If you "feel its over complicated in a lot of areas", then you probably haven't found out the efficient way.

                    So, rather than us explaining how you can jump through several hoops to schedule Curtainwall panels as doors and windows, I'll ask:
                    What do you need in your Schedule? Why do you need to force doors and windows to be panels?
                    Why not simply use Doors and Windows?
                    Do you have a sample of a schedule you're trying to replicate?
                    Dave Plumb
                    BWBR Architects; St Paul, MN

                    CADsplaining: When a BIM rookie tells you how you should have done something.

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