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    Residential Windows

    I never deal with residential style windows so this may seem like an obvious question.

    How important is it to stick with standard sizes when selecting windows?

    I know they can do custom sizes but I understood that was atypical and, I assume, more expensive. Curtainwall/storefront is always job specific.

    Thoughts?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Greg McDowell Jr
    about.me/GMcDowellJr

    #2
    Originally posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
    I never deal with residential style windows so this may seem like an obvious question.

    How important is it to stick with standard sizes when selecting windows?

    I know they can do custom sizes but I understood that was atypical and, I assume, more expensive. Curtainwall/storefront is always job specific.

    Thoughts?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The short answer is, yes stick with standard sizes if there is a project budget. But really I would talk with the suppliers (not the reps) there is a big difference in being able to do custom sizes and the cost of those custom sizes. It also depends on brand and window line, most wood windows are only in standard units, but a simple vinyl in the same brand different line might allow customization by the 1/8" increments.


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      #3
      Originally posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
      I never deal with residential style windows so this may seem like an obvious question.

      How important is it to stick with standard sizes when selecting windows?

      I know they can do custom sizes but I understood that was atypical and, I assume, more expensive. Curtainwall/storefront is always job specific.

      Thoughts?


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
      Just depends.

      There are a few window lines that don't offer custom sizes, so that needs to be checked before selecting a manufacturer/model.

      Assuming the windows can be custom sized, it depends on budget and size of project. Custom sizes up-charges range from none to a few hundred dollars per window... I think on a recent project I did with something like Milgard or Andersen windows (which there are several styles), it was ~$100 - $200 a window IIRC, but don't quote me on that.

      So if you're doing a large multi-family residential building with hundreds of windows, that can really add up. If it's a spec home, every dollar may count. If it's custom residential, it may not matter at all, or you pick your spots - use standard sizes where you can and use custom sizes where it would really make a difference. If you're replacing windows in an existing opening, it's usually cheaper to just get a custom size then deal with reframing and finishes.

      So usually it just comes down to money.

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        #4
        Originally posted by iru69 View Post
        So usually it just comes down to money.
        Naturally.

        That $200 increase you mentioned, what percentage increase is that over stock? (See how little I know about residential?)



        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
        Greg McDowell Jr
        about.me/GMcDowellJr

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          #5
          Originally posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
          Naturally.

          That $200 increase you mentioned, what percentage increase is that over stock? (See how little I know about residential?)

          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          $200 upcharge would be a wild estimate. Firstly a Milgard 4050XO vinly slider would cost prox $200USD. A 4050XO Anderson vinyl clad wood slider would cost prox $1200USD. So the custom size upcharge would be a lot different for those two products. In CA Milgard is the standard window for stock residential construction because the are readily available, are relatively inexpensive, come in custom sizes, and most importantly of all they have an original owner lifetime warranty on their insulated glass. A typical residential IG unit has a normal life time of 5 years so you can imagine the importance of this warranty. And, they stand behind it I can say with personal experience. In my last home in SLO county every door and window glass lite was replaced on the south and west elevations in the 6 years that I lived there, some of them twice. If I were an Architect I would never specify a residential window that didn't have this warranty. That said, there is really no solid answer to your question until you know what manufacturer(s) you are going to specify, window types (sliders, single hungs, projected, tilt and turn, and on and on), and sizes (prox). Once you know that the best thing to do is to contact the manufacturer and ask them the question.

          And no, I'm not a Milgard salesman
          I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

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            #6
            Originally posted by Dave Jones View Post
            And no, I'm not a Milgard salesman
            but they will probably send you some additional kick-backs this year after that

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              #7
              As Dave alluded to, the percentage increase would be dependent on how much you'd pay for the standard size windows, which is dependent on size, configuration, style/model, etc. It's generally not really relevant since the upcharge is often a fixed cost, whether it's a small window or a large window.

              Not really sure where you're going with this, but look at a window you're interested in specifying and then call a supplier and ask if/what the upcharge is for a custom size and how it's figured. Then multiply that by the number of windows you want custom size.

              Originally posted by GMcDowellJr View Post
              Naturally.

              That $200 increase you mentioned, what percentage increase is that over stock? (See how little I know about residential?)



              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                #8
                I bought a couple windows for my garage a year or two ago (c. 1920 and the stud spacing isn't exactly consistent so I ended up with weird sizes) and when ordering the guy said they generally are all made to order so the sizing didn't really matter which implied that there wasn't any extra cost for using a non-typical size. :crazy:
                Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


                chad
                BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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                  #9
                  From what I've experienced, as long as you fall within the minimum/maximum allowed sizes for the AAMA designation you need as well as match their incremental scaling (1/8" - 1/2" in some cases), there shouldn't be much of, if any, additional cost. Metal clad or other dual-material frames would likely be the outlier.
                  Developer at Anguleris BIMsmith Marketplace.
                  Previously at Sumex Design for ARCAT.com

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by iru69 View Post
                    Not really sure where you're going with this.
                    Trying to determine how much effort I want to put into a family that corrects itself based on available nominal dimensions or if I should let the designers have it and do whatever they want... or some combination.

                    In the work I'm used too (which this is not) we don't know which manufacturer will ultimately show up on site. We use a basis of design but putting too many eggs in that basket can be a problem.

                    Based on all that's been said here, I'm not going to fuss with the added layer of logic.

                    Thanks all!
                    Greg McDowell Jr
                    about.me/GMcDowellJr

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