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    Consultant Doesn't Use Filters

    My Mechanical Consultant doesn't use filters. What's up with that? I can't think of one advantage. Anyone care to chime in?

    I am recreating my filters to recolor his systems according to system abbreviation because his systems are named Chilled Water Supply, Chilled Water Return, etc. Normally I create filters for System Type which I name CHWS CHWS, etc. But this consultant doesn't do it that way. Not a biggie but the first issue above (no filters) was a little shocking.

    Please share your thoughts.

    #2
    He doesn't need filters to apply color if he is assigning color via Piping System Type properties. A filter is desirable/recommended to control visibility...and certainly not via a workset.
    Last edited by kubsix; March 21, 2017, 04:39 PM.
    John Karben | IMEG Corp.

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      #3
      I don't really think it's an issue and have never had a problem with it, but I've heard some arguments that filters can add extra regen time to the views. I think the benefits far outweigh any downsides.

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        #4
        Originally posted by kubsix View Post
        He doesn't need filters to apply color if he is assigning color via Piping System Type properties. A filter is desirable/recommended to control visibility...and certainly not via a workset.
        Here's his pipe properties. Wondered if you could comment on how the systems are getting colored?

        Attached Files

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          #5
          System Graphic Overrides accessible from the systems type properties.
          Thomas N Fuller II

          LinkedIn

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            #6
            Originally posted by chris.macko View Post
            ...but I've heard some arguments that filters can add extra regen time to the views.
            Because of the large number of different systems that need to be distinguished from each other, consistently in all views, applying overrides per system is the easiest, fastest and most globally consistent method there is. Given the large number of filters that would be required to achieve the same thing, and the fact that if you want to create a new system type you would have to go through every single view template and set up a new filter, applying a Material via the System Properties is extremely efficient.
            It does also regen/render faster, because there is no logical test that needs to be checked for each element in the view for every filter, the system material is just a property of the elements. The difference is particularly noticeable when printing (To PDF at High quality in colour takes less than half the time with system materials compared to filters).

            There are smarter ways to reduce the number of filters required, like using reverse (IS NOT..) filters to hide everything you don't want, if you have a good hierarchical way of grouping types of systems by abbreviation.

            Ive only encountered a couple of times when architects have had problems with the system colours. I would be interested to know why using system materials is an issue and if there is a way to make it workable for other disciplines, because it really is a useful method for MEP views.
            "One must imagine Sisyphus happy." Albert Camus - "The innovator has for enemies all those who have done well under the old conditions, and lukewarm defenders in those who may ​do well under the new." Nicolo Machiavelli -"Things that are too complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple." Mikhail Kalashnikov

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              #7
              Originally posted by koolair View Post
              Wondered if you could comment on how the systems are getting colored?
              Project Browser > Families > Piping Systems > Double click or Right-click > Type Properties

              Piping Systems Type Properties.PNG
              John Karben | IMEG Corp.

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                #8
                Originally posted by josephpeel View Post
                Because of the large number of different systems that need to be distinguished from each other, consistently in all views, applying overrides per system is the easiest, fastest and most globally consistent method there is. Given the large number of filters that would be required to achieve the same thing, and the fact that if you want to create a new system type you would have to go through every single view template and set up a new filter, applying a Material via the System Properties is extremely efficient.
                It does also regen/render faster, because there is no logical test that needs to be checked for each element in the view for every filter, the system material is just a property of the elements. The difference is particularly noticeable when printing (To PDF at High quality in colour takes less than half the time with system materials compared to filters).

                There are smarter ways to reduce the number of filters required, like using reverse (IS NOT..) filters to hide everything you don't want, if you have a good hierarchical way of grouping types of systems by abbreviation.

                Ive only encountered a couple of times when architects have had problems with the system colours. I would be interested to know why using system materials is an issue and if there is a way to make it workable for other disciplines, because it really is a useful method for MEP views.
                That is very similar to the explanation I was getting at the time, and since I don't work in MEP and don't really have a need to show the systems, I can't argue with that logic at all. If there's a built-in way to accomplish something in less steps than filters than I'm all for that. I don't see how that would preclude them from using filters for anything else though. Using systems to color and sort things only addresses one graphic requirement. Like you said, reduce the number, don't eliminate them altogether.

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                  #9
                  Making the switch to filter based coloring was due to the fact of how much time it took to go through each system type and change its color to black before uploading, due to client requests. Sure it took time to set up all the filters, but the time saved not having to manually change colors to black before uploads was easily worth it. I suppose Dynamo could now help "automate" that task.

                  As for performance hits, I don't recall any difference after making the switch although I never ran a comparison.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by chompi0n View Post
                    I suppose Dynamo could now help "automate" that task.
                    Or the client could add a single pipe filter to his view(s) to change them all to black instead. Filters trump Piping Systems Properties graphics.
                    John Karben | IMEG Corp.

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