Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

CLR vs. MIN vs....MIN CLR?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    CLR vs. MIN vs....MIN CLR?

    Hi all!

    I've been trying to wrap my head around the difference between saying something like 36" CLR versus 36" MIN on dimension strings, but I was hoping someone here could explain it clearly to me. Someone explained that using "CLR" denotes that there is a requirement of some sort but "MIN" simply means that that's a minimum. In my head, in both cases, it stands that when you use either, it means that there is a minimum required dimension but it can be longer if there ends up being extra space.

    and then there's...MIN CLR? Eek, the more I try to reason and think about it, the more confused I get :hide:

    Thanks for the help in advance

    #2
    Originally posted by darryl View Post
    Hi all!

    I've been trying to wrap my head around the difference between saying something like 36" CLR versus 36" MIN on dimension strings, but I was hoping someone here could explain it clearly to me. Someone explained that using "CLR" denotes that there is a requirement of some sort but "MIN" simply means that that's a minimum. In my head, in both cases, it stands that when you use either, it means that there is a minimum required dimension but it can be longer if there ends up being extra space.

    and then there's...MIN CLR? Eek, the more I try to reason and think about it, the more confused I get :hide:

    Thanks for the help in advance
    I've never really given it much thought. If you need 36", then either will work IMO. I really don't see a difference. I'd chalk it up to personal preference.

    OR

    Maybe clear is for horizontal space, as in clear floor space. And minimum is for heights. Like 36' tall minimum?? Hell, I don't know. I just draw stuff. :laugh:
    Dan

    Comment


      #3
      There might be all sorts of interpretations, but mine is:

      CLR. (clear) generally is dimensioned to finishes and denotes the minimum "finished" dimensional space... typically used to indicate that a building code dimensional requirement has been met and is clear of obstructions, e.g. width of an egress corridor, accessibility clearances, etc., but generally is not used as a framing dimension.

      MIN. (minimum) and MAX. (maximum) is similar in some ways, but typically used as a framing dimension, and it does not necessarily imply that the dimension is clear of obstructions, e.g., the setback line of a structure, or the overall distance between two walls.
      Last edited by iru69; August 23, 2011, 08:56 PM.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by iru69 View Post
        There might be all sorts of interpretations, but mine is:

        CLR. (clear) generally is dimensioned to finishes and denotes the minimum "finished" dimensional space... typically used to indicate that a building code dimensional requirement has been met and is clear of obstructions, e.g. width of an egress corridor, accessibility clearances, etc., but generally is not used as a framing dimension.

        MIN. (minimum) and MAX. (maximum) is similar in some ways, but typically used as a framing dimension, and it does not necessarily imply that the dimension is clear of obstructions, e.g., the setback line of a structure, or the overall distance between two walls.
        with 41 years in the construction biz I'd agree with these definitions. Also "CLR" is a fixed dimension while "MIN" and "MAX" are variable dimensions
        I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

        Comment


          #5
          Well, yeah. Clear is fixed. But if that fixed is labeled as a MIN. then you can't be less so it's fixed as well. Unless you are in the southern hemisphere. Then min becomes the clear and max is the clear + a tolerance.

          Now, if you are in Europe, min and max aren't aloud in the country, so clear is the clear choice. Got it? :laugh:
          Dan

          Comment


            #6
            CLR means there's no crap within the dimension, no bolt heads, no funky welding residues, no trim, etc.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by dzatto View Post
              Well, yeah. Clear is fixed. But if that fixed is labeled as a MIN. then you can't be less so it's fixed as well. Unless you are in the southern hemisphere. Then min becomes the clear and max is the clear + a tolerance.

              Now, if you are in Europe, min and max aren't aloud in the country, so clear is the clear choice. Got it? :laugh:
              clear as mud, to steal a phrase from another thread
              I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Darken Rahl View Post
                CLR means there's no crap within the dimension, no bolt heads, no funky welding residues, no trim, etc.
                I disagree. CLR just means that the dimension is between here and here. An example is a 72" CLR dimension for a door opening width that could have a removable mullion in the middle of it.
                I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thank you for the replies everyone!

                  I guess I could take it as:
                  When CLR is on a dimension: the dimension is fixed as is but the CLR note is mentioning the fact that there's a critical reason why that dimension is what it is (i.e. building code, ADA, etc.)...but there's no reason why it should be larger than what is shown.

                  When MIN/MAX is on a dimension: it's simply saying that the dimension should be X at a min/max but it can get bigger or smaller if there ends up being leftover space.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by darryl View Post
                    Thank you for the replies everyone!

                    I guess I could take it as:
                    When CLR is on a dimension: the dimension is fixed as is but the CLR note is mentioning the fact that there's a critical reason why that dimension is what it is (i.e. building code, ADA, etc.)...but there's no reason why it should be larger than what is shown.

                    When MIN/MAX is on a dimension: it's simply saying that the dimension should be X at a min/max but it can get bigger or smaller if there ends up being leftover space.
                    as with all discussion in here it's interesting to see what others perspectives are about certain things that I take for granted. I sometime find that what I thought to be "so" for many years is in fact not, or out of date, or out of fashion. I agree with your thoughts about CLR. Regarding MIN/MAX, I have never seen this on a dimension. Maybe the same as PLUS/MINUS (+/-) ??
                    I'm retired, if you don't like it, go around!

                    Comment

                    Related Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X