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Revit 2017 Residential Details

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    Revit 2017 Residential Details

    I am in the process of learning Revit and i have chosen to start with a simple ranch house design. When placing a floor in the model i find that my oak hardwood flooring goes under the exterior walls along with the plywood and joist. Ideally the oak would stop at the sheetrock or at least at the stud wall. I have tried extending the floor into the core but that didn't work. Since the moisture barrier and the oak flooring are outside the core boundary I thought it would stop at the wall. But it doesn't. Could someone point me in the right direction to accomplish this task?
    And while I'm asking about this area, how do you get a sill plate on top of the concrete stem wall?thank you for your help.

    Russ

    #2
    Model each part of the floor separately and put them on top of each other
    Alex Page
    RevitWorks Ltd
    Check out our Door Factory, the door maker add-in for Revit

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      #3
      You can use a sweep to model the sill plate. I find it to be a pain to model plates, sometimes fun though.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Alex Page View Post
        Model each part of the floor separately and put them on top of each other
        I agree with Alex. When in doubt, model it like it gets built.

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          #5
          I've learned to take a more pragmatic approach as to whether or not to deeply model elements. If there is no benefit for a particular project, I don't bother, particularly things like mud sills.

          Where floors sit relative to the LEVEL is more important. On simple projects, my LEVELS are to finish floor, assuming some imaginary fixed height, like 3/4" for hardwood in the floor assembly. If i bother with other finishes in the floor assemlby, they have to have the same height. This approach is simplistic but cost effective, and easy to manage. On more complicated projects, I'll use LEVELS for both top of plywood and top of finish. The top of finish LEVEL in this case is still using some fixed height, but on those projects, we're making an effort to align everything. The delta between the two LEVELS can be fairly substantial with various build-up like sound isolation, gyp crete etc. In the resulting elevation or section views, what LEVELS show is dependent on the scale, and who the view is aimed at, ie the builder or the Planning Department.
          Fred Blome
          Residential Architect

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            #6
            Maybe I'm misunderstanding, but I think what your saying is that you want to offset the base of the wall's finish layer(s) to make room to "slide" the flooring under. If so, you can modify the wall type to do this: offset the finish layer from the wall base. Then you can easily sketch a floor boundary that follows the perimeter of the wall core.

            As far as the plate atop a stem wall, there are several approaches. One that recently intrigued me, was a stem wall with the sill plate built into it using a sweep profile. Typically, I just place sill on finished floor level which is top of slab or stem wall.

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              #7
              Some Success

              I tried the sweep method for the sill plate and it worked very well. I also tried adding the finish flooring on top of the subfloor and that worked except that my finish floor level is 3/4" off. I don't think that will be a problem at this point. I appreciate the help.

              The next hurdle is to try and get the siding and sheathing on the exterior wall to extend down to the top of the stem wall. A wall sweep doesn't work because the material is below the bottom of the wall and thus it can't attach the sweep. I thought of making, or modeling a family type to mimic the siding and sheathing, but I have no idea how I would attach that to the wall. It seems like such a common detail there should be a way to make it happen. So far Revit is great. It just takes a while to figure how the program wants to do each aspect of architectural design.

              Thank again for the help.

              Russ Parker

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                #8
                Also, try joining the wall and floor assembly. If you offset the bottom of the wall to be the bottom of the joists, and "extend to to core" the floor boundary, then join the wall and floor Revit will do a pretty decent job of fitting it together. The finishes are joined by function in this case.

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                  #9
                  Joining the wall / floor sort of worked. What happens is that when I extend the wall to the top of the foundation wall, ignoring the sill plate, the interior finish layer (sheetrock) extends through the sill plate and shows the two lines representing the sheetrock. If I extend the wall to the top of the sill plate the exterior sheathing and siding stop at the top of the sill and do not cover as they should. It looks like what should be a simple process is actually more complex than it needs to be causing work-arounds or additional detailing to make up the difference. Granted Revit makes it easier to document the design process but at this point in my learning experience I'm wondering why some things are so easy and others so difficult.

                  I appreciate all the help. I will continue learning Revit as it is after all an amazing program. But I'm limited to evenings and weekends as I work as a steel detailer using Autodesk's Advance Steel BIM program. At times I wish that Revit worked more like Advance Steel allowing the design process to be more intuitive. Perhaps someday.

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