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Thermostats and VAVs (Terminal Units)

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    Thermostats and VAVs (Terminal Units)

    Ive been trying to figure out how to add thermostats into revit and connect them to specific VAV units.

    #2
    Connected with wiring into a circuit for electrical plans?

    having a tag containing what thermostat is serving what VAV?

    Or both?

    Taging them is not that hard to show what theromstat goes to what vav create a parameter that has unit served or something in the like in your thermostat faced based family and have and fill it out to show the VAV that that thermostat is showing
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    Last edited by Darius; January 24, 2017, 03:24 PM.

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      #3
      This is one area where Autodesk has let us mechanical people down, IMO. This is a basic thing that almost all HVAC Designers and engineers do and it would be easy for them to create some sort of "smart" connection, such that the Thermostat could indicate the Mark of the Equipment it was assigned to.

      We've been doing two ways. The first way is basically faking it, in which we use Annotation symbols to represent the T-stats, with a label linked to a text parameter that we can edit. The downside is that the thermostats aren't modeled, and some architects want to see them when they link in our MEP model. The other downside is if I change "VAV-1" to be "VAV-2", I have to also make that change on my Thermostat Symbol.

      The second way (and the way I prefer to do it) is to use a modeled, wall-hosted Thermostat family, which I placed in the "Communication Device" Family Category. I then have a Communication Device Tag that I use for the "T" symbol on the plans. This makes the architects happy, but I still don't have my "smart" link between the VAV and the Thermostat.

      I wasn't happy with that second solution, so I started tinkering with Dynamo to see if I could create a function that gave me that dynamic link that I was looking for. After a lot of tinkering, I got it work. It basically involved creating a Dynamo version of Excel's VLOOKUP from scratch which was educational to say the least! See my posts over on the Dynamo board if you want to learn more about how I did it.
      Last edited by Necro99; January 24, 2017, 07:38 PM.

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        #4
        I use a Mechanical Equipment family adapted from a Electrical Fixture family. This includes many symbols for different sensor types and orientations( I haven't yet figured out how to get a symbol to rotate correctly). The modeled geometry includes a face plate on the face of the wall and a connection box within the wall as well as a controls connector.
        All of our Mechanical equipment families that need a thermostat also have a controls connector included. In the project environment after a T-stat and associated equipment are added I use the circuiting functions within Revit to add wiring between units and associated thermostats/sensors. This is much easier than using model lines between equipment and thermostats/sensors because Revit can draw the wires for you and they flex when equipment or T-stats need to move.
        Thanks,
        Dan

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          #5
          I can see how creating controls circuits would work if your firm's graphical standard was to draw a line between the Thermostat and the equipment it serves. My firm's standard is to put the designation of the equipment served under the Thermostat symbol. But I would do the same thing if the "line method" was our standard. Anything to avoid detail lines!

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            #6
            Another strategy I have used is when I need a tag instead of a wire is to create a new mechanical equipment tag(or a tag for whatever category your t-stat is with the exception of Generic Annotation) and use the Mark parameter to populate the tag. It will need to be manually filled out for each t-stat. Or use a product like BIM link to fill out in a spreadsheet then import back in. The advantage is that the tag will move when the t-stat moves. I use any way I can to avoid using dumb text. Hope this helps.
            Thanks,
            Dan

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              #7
              Originally posted by DMapes View Post
              I use a Mechanical Equipment family adapted from a Electrical Fixture family. This includes many symbols for different sensor types and orientations( I haven't yet figured out how to get a symbol to rotate correctly). The modeled geometry includes a face plate on the face of the wall and a connection box within the wall as well as a controls connector.
              All of our Mechanical equipment families that need a thermostat also have a controls connector included. In the project environment after a T-stat and associated equipment are added I use the circuiting functions within Revit to add wiring between units and associated thermostats/sensors. This is much easier than using model lines between equipment and thermostats/sensors because Revit can draw the wires for you and they flex when equipment or T-stats need to move.
              Do you need to create a panel in the project to make this work?
              Steve Germano

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                #8
                Originally posted by sgermano View Post
                Do you need to create a panel in the project to make this work?
                No, it's just a Communication Device Family (the thermostat) that connects to the Mechanical Equipment Family (the VAV box), so as long as both items contain the proper connector.

                -TZ
                Tannar Z. Frampton ™
                Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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