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3D interior scans and Drone Scans to Revit

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  • wgfletch
    replied
    feel free to give us a call, I know personally I owe you a beer or two from tips on here throughout the year

    Leave a comment:


  • Twiceroadsfool
    replied
    Hahaha. Im actually supposedly heading to Rochester/Syracuse next week, for some work.

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  • wgfletch
    replied
    Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
    Wow, Small world. You're working with Greg Hale, and used to be at OBG? I built the original Revit Model for the OBG Tenant Fitout in Washington Station, back when i still lived and worked in Syracuse. Small world!

    Tell Greg "Maller says hi," lol.
    yesir, i will do that
    Your name has come up before when I have mentioned various posts on revitforum to Greg and his first guess is almost always that Aaron Maller posted it

    I actually still live in lovely syracuse (I'm jealous you made it out to Dallas, snow storm up here all week)

    Love the OBG office, I was there for about 4 years

    At some point I will have to make a thread detailing some of the UAV/photogrammetry work we have done. I'm currently pulling together a nice big project that is coming together really well

    Leave a comment:


  • Twiceroadsfool
    replied
    Wow, Small world. You're working with Greg Hale, and used to be at OBG? I built the original Revit Model for the OBG Tenant Fitout in Washington Station, back when i still lived and worked in Syracuse. Small world!

    Tell Greg "Maller says hi," lol.

    Leave a comment:


  • wgfletch
    replied
    I do this for a living currently

    would be happy to answer any questions you have, feel free to shoot me a pm

    How you approach and leverage the can data (whether its from a territorial scanner or photogrammetry from a drone) is going to vary from project to project

    Leave a comment:


  • Karalon10
    replied
    Thanks guys, the real life experiences really help me there.

    So in short, point cloud is useful as background imaging, not so much for actual modeling.
    It was good to know about the slight inaccuracies, and how that can impact your model and documentation, that's a priceless little tidbit actually.

    I was recently involved in the early phases of a massive refit project, and was on site often to measure and take photos because the plans were all dating from the first phase of the building built in the 1930s, and several parts of the building the latest being done in the late 70s. So there were no cad plans, and some of the earlier 30's stuff had been pretty much lost and I had architectural plans that had sort of only guesstimated much of the project. In addition, there is just tons of pipework, steel platforms and machinery that was not at all shown in archi plans.

    It's an old rubbish incineration plant.
    The project is to decommission the old turbines, leaving 2 functioning (80 tonnes per day it needs to be able to continue to process).
    Once the old stuff is decommissioned there will be some serious structural changes to the building, and refit of 2 new turbines which will then be put online and the rest of the older stuff decommissioned and refit.
    As you can imagine, we are talking about massive machinery, and turbines, platforms everywhere and pipework like crazy.
    A scan is really the only viable, time realistic, option.
    I personally am no longer working on this project, thankfully, but I got the model of the existing building without all the interior pipes and machinery done from old plans, and on site measurements combined.

    Heres a picture just to give you an idea of the scope of that project - its due to be finished with all the refurb around 2020.
    One of the existing structure, and one of my model (I used google earth to import the topo and it's not right, but at that time was ok for what I needed - it's since been corrected.)
    Attached Files

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  • Drew
    replied
    Aaron is right. We have point clouds created for our large retail projects. The team were to use these as a REFERENCE in creating existing buildings, we also had existing dwg and pdf's. For whatever reasons, I had to constantly tell them to not treat the laser scan as GOSPEL, it is only a reference. They didn't listen and as such, we now have .99999 inaccuracies which cannot be removed.

    Also, keep in mind the scanner will only scan what it can see, so for your example of plant rooms, it won't pick up all of what you might need. You still need human eyes to verify what has been scanned and as mentioned, a ton of diligence when it is being modelled.

    Leave a comment:


  • Twiceroadsfool
    replied
    Right. And thats a great workflow, IMHO. The scanning is simply replacing hand or laser measuring for field verification, and then youre modeling it manually off the laser scan, the same way you would with hand measurements. Which means- chances are- you arent modeling things at insanely wonky dimensions.

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  • UKN
    replied
    We tend to use laser scanning for bigger projects and odd spaces. Casinos have a lot of weird stuff going on, and sometimes we have to model it as existing per client demands. Laser scanning is way faster and more accurate than we will ever be able to survey it.

    The latest project was a convention center where the only existing drawings were a bunch of bad bad tiff files. It took the laser scanning company a week to scan the whole space (meeting rooms, corridors, restrooms, pre-functions and ballrooms - 100,000+ SF) - they would send over finished area scans of the space so we could model it as they finished up the rest of the scans. It just saves us for a lot of field work, and when you get the relationship going with the scanning guys, they pretty much know what we are looking for in every project. As for the modelling - we model everything ourselves according to our standards - we haven't had the need (or guts) to outsource it.

    The other thing that laser scanning gives us is full photo documentation of the space that you can access through Recap or similar programs. Every scan produces 360 degrees images, so we rarely need to go back on site and check things once the scan is complete.

    Leave a comment:


  • Twiceroadsfool
    replied
    Originally posted by Karalon10 View Post
    I work in structures.

    From what I have seen, "converting" the model is not automatic but is fairly intelligent I can click on a point cloud object with my wall family and it will place to the same height/length/width as in the point cloud. However in some cases it might just be worth leaving the point cloud images in as a background and working with those as an aid rather than trying to make it form all of the model....again things I just don't know in this process.
    THIS is the part that currently works like unintelligent crap. A point cloud is convinced walls are at 89.9999999999 degrees, and a lot of the software on the market will model it as such. Just like imported stuff from AutoCAD that revit interprets as Garbage, if you introduce that 89.999999999 degrees in to your project, you are never fixing it, and never getting it to go away.

    Is it true that the wall is not at 90 degrees? Probably. But if you are planning on using that model for any type of renovation/documentation/project-work, you had better adjust to one of three realities:

    1. You had better be a champion at dimensioning non parallel things, going strictly point to point in all cases
    2. You had better accept the fact that *for documentation* you need it to be MODELED (not rounded) to 90 degrees
    3. You had better accept the fact that you cant use automated tools for modeling from point clouds.

    Leave a comment:

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