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    Adding Keynotes to Lines?

    Am I missing something really simple here, or is there really not a way to add keynotes to model lines & detail lines? I have a demolition plan where I have a bunch of old shelves dashed in (since they will be removed). I'd like to add a keynote to the dashed lines to give instructions for what to do with the shelves, but there seems no way to attach a keynotes to the lines. Anybody have a solution for this?

    #2
    Model the shelves, make sure they are on the Existing Phase, hit them with the Demolition Hammer Tool, they will then become dashed automatically, and you can apply keynotes to them.
    It's called "BIM" --not "drafting"..............LOL
    Cliff B. Collins
    Registered Architect
    The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
    Autodesk Expert Elite

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      #3
      I understand that I could do that and it wouldn't be too much trouble, but there just isn't a need to have 3d shelves in this case. They're not being shown in elevation or in any other view.

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        #4
        But you are keynoting them... thats enough reason to have it be a model element and thus keynotable.

        As a very crappy work around you can make a gen anno family "keynote". It sucks to work with in every way though.
        -Alex Cunningham

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          #5
          I understand that I could do that and it wouldn't be too much trouble, but there just isn't a need to have 3d shelves in this case. They're not being shown in elevation or in any other view. Famous last words................maybe for right now, but most likely at some point during the project a 3D view and more importantly--information about the shelving may become important. This is precisely why you CAN'T use Keynotes with 2D lines--because Revit is not intended to work like Cad.
          ( There actually IS a way, but I would not recommend it.)

          The time it takes to draw the lines is the same time it takes to model the shelves--but when you model them, now you have a much more useful object that can have its information made available, it's phase-aware for demolition, it's schedulable--so the GC could have quantities, etc. The list goes on and on. The ONLY "advantage" of "just using lines" is that someone who does not understand Revit and BIM may "think it's faster to just draw some lines".......LOL
          Sorry--I don't mean to come across harshly, but from many years of experience I've seen these same kind of situations come up over and over, and in the end it ALWAYS was a better answer to model it correctly and have a BIM solution instead of a "fast" half-baked drafting solution.
          Cliff B. Collins
          Registered Architect
          The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
          Autodesk Expert Elite

          Comment


            #6
            I understand the OP's point...I do not like to model shelves or other millwork just to demo it. If I need to show a demo elevation or section, for some reason, then I will model it. The options to keynotes are Element, Material and User. I have used the User keynote when I want to keynote something that isn't actually an element or material. It works fine.

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              #7
              Fine until someone ask you "how many linear feet of shelving and millwork are we removing?" (not to mention the what will "cover up the damage" question and quantities) If all you are required to deliver is some lines on a printed piece of paper, then fine. But it is always good to "think inside the model" as well.

              but I've already beat my point to death..............

              I just prefer to stay away from 2D un-intelligent objects as much as possible. To each his own.
              Cliff B. Collins
              Registered Architect
              The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
              Autodesk Expert Elite

              Comment


                #8
                I have a Line that can be keynoted, both in Detail Component and modeled family form. Its all about where you put your "line," as to whether or not you can Keynote it. And dont tell Cliff, but we even use it sometimes in our FULL BIM. LOL. Oh noes!
                Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                  #9
                  I know it's possible to come up with inventive ways of having a 2D object have "intelligence"--but WHY? (I've done some myself in the past, but then changed the workflow to a more purist BIM approach and have seen real-world benefits in doing so.)

                  I still don't see why a lot of users insist on using 2D stuff when it's so EASY to model it and have the advantages that a model element brings to the overall outcome.

                  So is a 2D Line and/or Detail Component for a shelf to be demolished really "FULL BIM"--or perhaps 1/2 BIM? --because you can't see it in lots of important views, it may not be easily quantified/scheduled, is not necessarily phase aware, etc.

                  I know that everyone sees my point--but for some reason lots of users still want to use 2D tools instead of modeling--which is fine if there's a strong advantage or "value-adding" benefit--which I'm just not convinced is there.
                  Cliff B. Collins
                  Registered Architect
                  The Lamar Johnson Collaborative Architects, St. Louis, MO
                  Autodesk Expert Elite

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Tell me Cliff:

                    You get a PDF of the existing conditions: It shows shelves. It doesnt tell you how tall they are, or how many there are. It says they run along this wall, from this point, to this point. And the owner tells you *thats all* the information you have, period, end of story.

                    Without the rhetoric about what 'real BIM is,' (i dont need the lecture, thanks, nor do i need the answer of "ill go laser scan the existing conditions," because- time and budget permitting, we do that), how do you show it *modeled* correctly when you dont have any more information other than: It runs 12 feet in length in a plan?

                    And before you say its a dumb question: Ive done a heck of a lot of jobs where that IS the situation. Thats what you get, and thats all you have to work with.

                    Now, Im in favor of having an INTELLIGENT note that says "Cabinets to be demolished, verify extents of cabinets and extents of patchwork as required to restore adjacent objects to pre-installation condition," but what im NOT a fan of is SHOWING something as REAL (real modeled stuff to "guesswork" dimensions, that havent really been verified. A line (in 2d or 3d, who cares) that DOESNT show more information makes someone stop and say *hey, there isnt a ton of information here, i wonder why?" Which is a heck of a lot *more intelligent* than having someone THINK they know the scope of work, then get there and find out the starchitect was WRONG.

                    Theres nothing "purist BIM value adding" about putting fake stuff in a model, just because.
                    Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
                    @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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