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    No Corresponding Levels

    We, an MEP consulting firm, are starting a project of a row of six townhouses, each one steps down an average of about a foot. The architect is only using three levels based on the highest unit, first floor, second floor, and attic. If we only use these levels, our offsets will need to adjusted according to unit based on these. We shouldn't have a particularly hard time doing this as it is such a small project but I'm having trouble getting my head around not having a set of levels for each unit.

    What is best practice for this situation? Keep it simple with just three levels, or have a set of levels for each unit?

    #2
    Originally posted by RobDraw View Post
    We, an MEP consulting firm, are starting a project of a row of six townhouses, each one steps down an average of about a foot. The architect is only using three levels based on the highest unit, first floor, second floor, and attic. If we only use these levels, our offsets will need to adjusted according to unit based on these. We shouldn't have a particularly hard time doing this as it is such a small project but I'm having trouble getting my head around not having a set of levels for each unit.

    What is best practice for this situation? Keep it simple with just three levels, or have a set of levels for each unit?
    I would add the necessary levels. You will only be able to monitor the three in the architectural model so be cautious if something changes.
    Tannar Z. Frampton ™
    Frampton & Associates, Inc.

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      #3
      My OCD wants me to add them but we are going to give it a shot with just the three. HVAC systems are very simple and since the other trades are giving it a go with just the three, we will too. We have been given the option to add them, if we see fit.

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