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    Copy Monitor

    I was under the assumprion that the monitor part of copy monitor would move elements that moved in the linked model.

    Is this true? I can't seem to figure out the thing.

    #2
    It should give you a warning if any monitored items have changed in any way. Do a coordination review on the linked model that the monitored objects are copied from.
    Thanks,
    Dan

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      #3
      Originally posted by DMapes View Post
      It should give you a warning if any monitored items have changed in any way. Do a coordination review on the linked model that the monitored objects are copied from.
      Thanks! that helps!

      Comment


        #4
        So copy/monitor allows you a bi-directional communication with another model.
        The idea is that anything "monitored" that moves in your linked model will give you a warning and some options to edit, or reject the changes.
        Coordination review (under the collaborate tab) is the way to do it.
        It works very well, and you can export a GBXML document to track your changes also.
        It does not automatically apply changes between the host model and the linked model, you must go through the coordination review and you will see a drop down selection next to each modification.

        Keep in mind that these changes are not bi-directional. That is if you make changes in your model, the other consultant will not see them unless he has copy/monitored your elements also. It is important to come up with a good workflow and definition of "ownership" of elements, so that you can manage this process between disciplines effectively.

        The way I have done this in the past is during the Design Development stage of the project the architect has full control and we copy monitor all structural elements. This allows the Arch team full range of control for modifications to suit client needs and to be flexible during the DD phase. Once you get into For Construction drawings you definitely want to have full control of structural elements, so you break all of your "monitor" controls on the project, and now the architect will monitor your model. This means any changes to structural elements need to be passed through the structural discipline which means the engineer gets to approve changes to (for example) column size or position, wall thickness, removal of load bearing elements etc. These all need to have calculations done to ensure the design still works, and this forces the arch team to filter these kind of important changes through the design team. Basically it removes or reduces the possibility of human error and enhances communication.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Karalon10 View Post
          So copy/monitor allows you a bi-directional communication with another model.
          The idea is that anything "monitored" that moves in your linked model will give you a warning and some options to edit, or reject the changes.
          Coordination review (under the collaborate tab) is the way to do it.
          It works very well, and you can export a GBXML document to track your changes also.
          It does not automatically apply changes between the host model and the linked model, you must go through the coordination review and you will see a drop down selection next to each modification.

          Keep in mind that these changes are not bi-directional. That is if you make changes in your model, the other consultant will not see them unless he has copy/monitored your elements also. It is important to come up with a good workflow and definition of "ownership" of elements, so that you can manage this process between disciplines effectively.

          The way I have done this in the past is during the Design Development stage of the project the architect has full control and we copy monitor all structural elements. This allows the Arch team full range of control for modifications to suit client needs and to be flexible during the DD phase. Once you get into For Construction drawings you definitely want to have full control of structural elements, so you break all of your "monitor" controls on the project, and now the architect will monitor your model. This means any changes to structural elements need to be passed through the structural discipline which means the engineer gets to approve changes to (for example) column size or position, wall thickness, removal of load bearing elements etc. These all need to have calculations done to ensure the design still works, and this forces the arch team to filter these kind of important changes through the design team. Basically it removes or reduces the possibility of human error and enhances communication.
          Thank you that was incredibly clear and helpful.

          Comment


            #6
            Oh I might add that another helpful workflow I use is :

            Create a 3D model (or several) for coordination purposes when using copy/monitor.

            What I do is make my arch model red, and my model green in a 3D view.
            Then I separate into models for each element for example:
            1 model for slabs (ie in VG options turn everything except slabs off)
            1 model for walls (VG options turn all except walls off)
            1 model for columns (you get the idea)

            Now visually, in 2 seconds, I can see if a red wall is misaligned with a green wall.
            Then as I run through my modifications, I can see each being resolved properly, and the element it applies to.
            Basically, this lets me micromanage and visually verify each change as it is happening (or as it is rejected)

            That is my personal workflow but I find it invaluable in the coordination process because when I get an updated model from an architect before I even go to my collaborate tab I can see if there are changes that need attention and if the changes are reasonable or need me to notify the engineer or not. Sometimes its a non load bearing wall moving around and the engineer doesn't give a stuff.

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