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Levels for Ceilings?

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    Levels for Ceilings?

    What's the consensus here? I get a lot of models from consultants, and I am having troubles using view templates set with the "level above" in the view range because of levels for ceilings. Why are levels for ceilings needed? Is this just bad practice, or am I missing something?

    #2
    I've never used levels for ceilings - in 2016R2+ I now set their level above floor as a global parameter so they can be tied together and changed easily (as most ceiling heights are the same). Before then, it was a more manual task, but I don't use levels for anything other than finished floor level.
    "I WANT SOUP! This fork is useless! I'm going to use my spoon for everything."

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      #3
      No to levels for ceilings. The tags read 8'-0" or whatever from the level they are on. room tags wouldn't work. Very bad idea to do levels for ceilings!!!!
      Scott D. Brown, AIA | Senior Project Manager | Beck Group

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        #4
        1 level per building story, and thats IT. I dont even use a second level for stepped floor levels.
        Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
        @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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          #5
          Originally posted by Twiceroadsfool View Post
          1 level per building story, and thats IT. I dont even use a second level for stepped floor levels.
          Out of morbid curiosity - how would you handle the following:
          Building built circa 1910
          Addition built circa 1960 - every (new) level is about 60" lower than the associated level in the main building.

          Do the addition levels get their own Revit level?

          At this point it is an academic discussion on my end as the job is out but it was a huge pain to deal with, especially since the client required that each level (original level + new level) be in the same plan...
          Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


          chad
          BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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            #6
            What Aaron said. One per level and done.

            I had a boss who went crazy with the levels and it drove me nuts.

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              #7
              Originally posted by cellophane View Post
              Out of morbid curiosity - how would you handle the following:
              Building built circa 1910
              Addition built circa 1960 - every (new) level is about 60" lower than the associated level in the main building.

              Do the addition levels get their own Revit level?

              At this point it is an academic discussion on my end as the job is out but it was a huge pain to deal with, especially since the client required that each level (original level + new level) be in the same plan...
              60 inches is pushing it, and id probably have another level. That has nothing to do with what shows up in the plan: I would still have them in one plan, if the client really wanted it that way.

              But what i was referring to, is i work with Project Manager who think they need a level at 99, 100, and 101 when the first floor has two steps in it, so that there is a "floor" at each level. Inevitably, when they are having disasters with Rooms, Components on the wrong level, and stuff not working as they *thought* it would, i would get an a-ha moment to share with them, lol...
              Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
              @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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                #8
                Originally posted by Cyus View Post
                ...but I don't use levels for anything other than finished floor level.
                Not the structural level? How do you deal with areas that are just the concrete, with carpet, with tiling, with a raised timber floor all at different FFLs? Yes sometimes we marry them together so they share an FFL, but mostly not. Is your FFL constant?

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by anthonyB View Post
                  Not the structural level? How do you deal with areas that are just the concrete, with carpet, with tiling, with a raised timber floor all at different FFLs? Yes sometimes we marry them together so they share an FFL, but mostly not. Is your FFL constant?
                  Generally the structural engineer sets the structural levels in their model. I haven't found it beneficial to duplicate their levels to have structural levels in my model also.
                  "I WANT SOUP! This fork is useless! I'm going to use my spoon for everything."

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                    #10
                    For us it's not a case of "duplicating" structural levels, but actually "defining" or "prescribing" them. To our (dis)credit we'll have often developed a schematic structural arrangement (in our model) well before there's an s.eng appointment - after which we retain the levels (and modelled elements, albeit "parked" in a non-primary DO) for comparitive "analysis" against the s.eng developed proposals (aids with our documentation also)

                    I'm also "guilty" of using multiple levels for "stepped" stories. #shootme

                    But no, no levels for ceilings, ever.

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