Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Autodesk University: The AU Class Selection Process

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Autodesk University: The AU Class Selection Process

    For a small group of people at Autodesk, AU is a year round project. As content manager for AU, I am part of this group. One of the most difficult periods of my job is now coming to an end. Every year, after we contact all potential presenters that have submitted a proposal for the upcoming Autodesk University, my in-box gets flooded. First with speakers thanking me for having their session accepted but also folks whose session did not get accepted. This year, because of the record number of submissions (2,388) from a record number of potential presenters (1,118), the number of submissions we were unable to accommodate was significantly higher. Over the last few weeks I have been contacted by many speakers whose classes did not get accepted. After answering the "Why not…" and "How can I get accepted next year…" questions, I am left with the impression that the AU selection process is perceived as a mystery. It clearly is not a mystery – it is a numbers game and submissions have to fit within the curriculum plan. Here is how class selections were made.
    AU first and foremost is a learning event. It is very important to Autodesk to maintain that experience while at the same time keeping an eye on what's happening in the industry, what are the big trends that will affect our customers and how can we take best take advantage of technology to deliver more value with Autodesk University. We want the learning experience at AU not only focus on latest product feature training but inspire attendees to do their work more efficient. The 3rd word in the AU tag line LEARN, CONNECT, EXPLORE was chosen to describe this interactive learning experience AU represent.
    The selection process for content started with a content brief that each of the track managers created, sometime back in February. At a high level, it outlined each of the topics that they we wanted to get covered in each track or for each product. We also interviewed technologists throughout the company to learn what they think will be important for our customers to be aware of. Finally, we asked AU members what topics would they like Autodesk executives to cover at AU – and what topics they would like to learn about at AU. The input from those three sources resulted in the topics list you see here. This information was also posted to the Call for Proposals website to encourage submissions around topics.
    And the encouragement worked. Not only did we receive a record number of submissions, we received many great ones tailored to what we asked for on the CFP website. Some topics resonated more than others. We did end up with close to 600 submissions for Revit Architecture alone. Within all those submissions, many were specific to families, visualization or other topics listed on the CFP site. With only ~60 slots allocated to Revit Architecture, almost 90% of submission could not be accepted. If half the speakers would not have accepted their speaking engagement, we could have easily filled those slots with those on the backup list and delivered an AU program of equal quality. Revit Architecture was extreme in the number of proposals but most tracks had 2 to 3 times the submissions than we were able to accept.
    Autodesk products of course play an important role in many industries and Autodesk University is the place where users from all those industries come together and the content offered is reflective of all those customers. At the end of the day, AU is trying to deliver a learning experience
    *
    *


    Click here to view the entire blog post.

Related Topics

Collapse

Working...
X