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GTX 670 or Quadro 2000

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    GTX 670 or Quadro 2000

    Hi there! I have build a new workstation.
    CPU : 2x x5680
    RAM: 16 GB
    I have only 2 choices for my GPU : GTX670 and Quadro 2000. Which is the better? (I only use for working)
    Last edited by nhatien93; September 12, 2015, 02:31 AM.

    #2
    The way I understand it is this:

    Quadro cards offer stability and precision, whereas GeForce cards offer raw clock speed. However, depending on what you're doing, you won't see much difference between the two as far as refresh/render is concerned, but I would always choose stability when it comes to doing my work. We're loving the Quadro K620's, for under $200 US it's more than enough for a Revit workstation.

    In my experience, the CPU makes the biggest difference with Revit, particularly the clock rate, followed by a decent amount of memory. We have machines with the latest Xeons that feel slower than the i7's that were definitely less expensive, and it's all about the clock rate of the CPU and the single threaded performance.
    Tim Collier
    CAD/IT Support
    Cromwell Architects Engineers
    Little Rock, Arkansas

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      #3
      Originally posted by nhatien93 View Post
      Hi there! I have build a new workstation.
      CPU : 2x x5680
      RAM: 16 GB
      I have only 2 choices for my GPU : GTX670 and Quadro 2000. Which is the better? (I only use for working)
      Hi nhatien - welcome to RFO!

      Both are good choices for general Revit usage. The GTX670 offers better performance and you should not have any issues using it with Revit. However, as Colliert alludes to, the Quadro offers better "official" support by Autodesk, so there's even less chance of compatibility issues.

      Those are some pretty old parts, especially the CPUs. Building this from used parts?

      Good luck!

      Originally posted by colliert View Post
      The way I understand it is this:

      Quadro cards offer stability and precision, whereas GeForce cards offer raw clock speed. However, depending on what you're doing, you won't see much difference between the two as far as refresh/render is concerned, but I would always choose stability when it comes to doing my work. We're loving the Quadro K620's, for under $200 US it's more than enough for a Revit workstation.

      In my experience, the CPU makes the biggest difference with Revit, particularly the clock rate, followed by a decent amount of memory. We have machines with the latest Xeons that feel slower than the i7's that were definitely less expensive, and it's all about the clock rate of the CPU and the single threaded performance.
      Thanks Colliert for your help. I just want to clarify a few things, and sorry in advance if I'm a little short on elaboration...

      Quadro cards are not inherently more "stable", it's just that Autodesk puts more work into verifying compatibility between Revit and those Quadro cards. But a GeForce card can be just as stable, assuming the driver is compatible. Also, Quadro cards do not offer any more "precision" than any other GPU. Also, the Q2000 is a decent GPU, but on large models with lots of eye candy turned on, a considerably faster GPU like the GTX670 may offer perceivably better performance. Hard to know in advance in exactly what circumstances it becomes perceivable, but for instance, I'd bet I would notice a performance difference between a K620 and a GTX670 on the models we work with.

      Right you are with the CPU's single-threaded performance, though it needs to be noted that the "architecture" of CPU, e.g. Haswell, Skylake, etc. makes a huge difference when discussing clock-speed. E.g. the X5680's have a base clock of 3.33GHz, which isn't terrible by any stretch as a measure of clock-speed - but they're 2010-era Westmere-EP architecture - a Haswell (or newer) i7 CPU of similar clock-speed would offer 50%+ better performance for single-threaded operations.

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        #4
        I have GTX 660 OC, it is old but it does the job, now I will buy second one for SLI. If you ask me I would never buy quadro cerd. Why? Because they are almost same as GTX only difference is in drivers, and you spend much more money, commercial trick. GTX are faster, and quadro can handle more polygons, but new GTX cards can handle also a lot of polygons, it is like my friend from other forum said offroad car (quadro) and sports car (gtx) one is speed other is raw power. Also on GTX can play games, dont know about quadro. Faster GPU render is with GTX. Here is link of a guy cutting condensators on GTX and converting it to Quadro or similar card At beggining there was a patch for GTX card so you can use it like quadro, later Nividia close it and now it is GTX and Quadro

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          #5
          Thanks all!

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            #6
            Honestly, I'd try to find another builder if those are your options. The Quadro 2000 is a 5 year old card... no way I'd put that in a new system. The 670, while quite capable, is near 3 years old. If I'm building a "new" computer, the oldest part I'd put in is maybe one generation back if it saves me a lot of money. The 670 is 4 generations old, the Quadro is at least 6 I believe. The processor you've spec'd is about 5 years old too.

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              #7
              I'm running the slightly higher spec GTX 780 with Revit, with no issues whatsoever. I used to use Quadro cards, but I also use Lumion, and Lumion and Quadro don't tend to get along. To be honest, as someone already said, processor and RAM are the main things that drive Revit. The video card is mostly only used for rendering, so if you don't use Revit's rendering facility, I don't think it would make much difference which card you use.

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