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What is the purpose of a RCP? Walls going through doors.

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    What is the purpose of a RCP? Walls going through doors.

    Capture.PNGCapture1.PNG

    Ok, Can someone please explain what is the purpose of having a reflected ceiling plan in revit. Why not just have a floor plan and stick a ceiling grid on?

    Why is the bottom plane and the cut plane the same.

    AND why can I not get the wall going through the door not to show on my RCP.

    The office I work in wants the standard to be no walls going the the door. The picture is how I want it to look.

    #2
    Originally posted by BIM Warrior View Post
    Can someone please explain what is the purpose of having a reflected ceiling plan in revit. Why not just have a floor plan and stick a ceiling grid on?
    Traditionally a "ceiling plan", as you're seemingly used to it, was just another (drawn/copy) floor plan showing what (little) information was involved in communicating the ceiling condition - but in a modern world where ceilings are now (sadly) all too often covered in equipment, the value of dedicated drawing comes into it's own.

    As such, in Revit, the inversion of the view plane (in that it actually looks up, rather than down with an imaginary overlay) allows us to respect the ceiling as an equal to the floor.

    And knowing that we all need to do things differently, Revit gives us (an adjustable) View Range for RCPs to configure them just how we each individually require - so some firms cut through doors, some cut over. Some show doors, some do not.

    There have been plenty of lengthy discussions before on the setup of RCP view ranges, templates and filter-techniques - I'd urge you to seek them out and have a read, they might reveal to you a different way of thinking so far not considered by your office (who sound, I dare say, a little stuck in their ways).

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      #3
      Yes I agree with snowyweston, revit allows you to reconsider traditional RCP drawings that were just drawn over photocopied [onto film / tracing] or even hand-traced floor plans.

      In the end, you need the wall line above the door; if you have a cornice running on both sides of the wall, you'll get two lines there anyway. Having the wall there shows accurately the relationship between the ceiling and walls all around the room including above the door.

      But as snowyweston says, you can have it your [old] way too.

      Kamran
      Kamran Mirza
      Chartered Architect RIBA, ARB, PCATP

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