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    joint two walls

    All,

    Building a multi-family housing project. mixed use. wood frame.
    Someone suggested me to build the two revit walls to build one exterior wall.
    because
    we have constant exterior wall structure such as stud, gwb and insulation but different exterior cladding materiel such as brick, fiber cement, metal panel on every different floors.

    I did't like it at the first time but I don't see any major problems so far. Doors and windows can placed once the wall is joined....etc
    Is there any other problems we should expected to happen in the future?
    and having two wall system even recommended?

    THanks


    Chang lee

    #2
    Usually the two wall (or 3 wall) method is if you have a structural wall that is constant....such as concrete, cmu, rastra block, etc.... That way structural will only see that wall on their views and not have to use copy/monitor.

    The only issue is the wall joining can slow down Revit a bit...or sometimes a wall gets moved and the join is lost and you wonder where the heck your windows went as you look at your elevation sheet you just printed.
    Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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      #3
      Totally agree! MP.
      thanks

      Comment


        #4
        I'm not sure there is anything to be gained by doing it that way. From a management point of view, you are dealing with the same number of walls in the end, except you have to deal with joining them to get your openings to work. However, I do think there are times when this is a good way to go. I recently did a fairly complicated project with an exterior brick wall assembly that really turned into a PINA by the time we were done. In hindsight, if we had modeled the brick wall assembly separate from the interior finish walls, it might have been cleaner.

        Sounds like a contradiction, I know...maybe it doesn't matter one way or the way.

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          #5
          Originally posted by renogreen View Post
          I'm not sure there is anything to be gained by doing it that way. From a management point of view, you are dealing with the same number of walls in the end, except you have to deal with joining them to get your openings to work. However, I do think there are times when this is a good way to go. I recently did a fairly complicated project with an exterior brick wall assembly that really turned into a PINA by the time we were done. In hindsight, if we had modeled the brick wall assembly separate from the interior finish walls, it might have been cleaner.

          Sounds like a contradiction, I know...maybe it doesn't matter one way or the way.
          When we first started using Revit we had a wall type for every condition....so that meant 1 wall type for exterior finish, concrete wall, interior partition. Now if the concrete wall was a different size that was another wall type, if the interior partition changed that was another wall type. We had about 10 different interior partitions, two or three finishes and three different sizes of concrete walls. Now it's still early and I can't do the math without more coffee, but that is a lot of different wall types!! Going to the three wall approach cut down wall type sheets from six sheets to only one, maybe two if it was a multi-building sheet.

          Not only that, when rendering, having all those wall types next to each other created terrible walkthroughs.
          Michael "MP" Patrick (Deceased - R.I.P)

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            #6
            We use 2 walls, instead of 3, but the math works the same way regardless:

            If you build "thick wall types" your number of wall types will equal: Backups x Ext Finishes x Int Finishes, or Backups x Ext Finishes

            If you build "individual" wall types, your number of wall types will equal: Backups + Ext Finishes + Int Finishes, or Backups + Ext Finishes

            Its an order of magnitude less wall types.
            Aaron "selfish AND petulant" Maller |P A R A L L A X T E A M | Practice Technology Implementation
            @Web | @Twitter | @LinkedIn | @Email

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              #7
              It is also awesome for filtering walls. Give your finish walls (or any other type) a prefix: Finish-Brick, Finish-Siding and you can turn them all off in one-shot. Probably some better filtering methods than Type Name but it works as long as everything is named consistently.
              Revit for newbies - A starting point for RFO


              chad
              BEER: Better, Efficient, Elegant, Repeatable.

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