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    Door Hardware and Schedules

    Hi all,

    This is mostly for my own personal knowledge, but I was wondering how people do hardware schedules - of course, in Revit, but also just in general, as I am still a noob in terms of experience. The office that I work at does a lot of small projects where the hardware is just written as a list on the sheets or in the project manual, so I'm wondering if it's worth it (or possible) to use key schedules in situations like these or if I should just continue using the same method. However, before I can even consider trying "reinvent the wheel," I have to know what the heck I'm trying to reinvent.

    Would anyone be kind enough to share images (or Revit files) of their door schedule + door hardware schedules so I can get an idea of how other offices do these?

    Thanks in advance

    #2
    I don´t do hardware schedules. The Hardware MF will typically do all the tedious work, and provide us with different "sets of hardware" customized for our projects, and based on the handle design etc. of our choice (even before bid round) - So in the doors and the door schedule, we use a "Hardware Set" shared parameter, and just fill that with "Set A", "Set B", or whatever set fits the door.
    Klaus Munkholm
    "Do. Or do not. There is no try."

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      #3
      To date, we've yet to produce our ironmongery package out of Revit, but I'm getting there - and have it ready in our doors, I just need the "right job" with the "right people" to get into our schedules.

      But as with Klaus, we're never as explicit as "Hafale Cat No. XX" because of our contracts - and use spec-tied "codes" to keep things flexible in our models. No way are we at the stage of modelling each and every piece of ironmongery in a healthcare door - so it's purely parametric.

      Until of course someone goes and asks to see them in interior renders that is...

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by darryl View Post
        Hi all,

        This is mostly for my own personal knowledge, but I was wondering how people do hardware schedules - of course, in Revit, but also just in general, as I am still a noob in terms of experience. The office that I work at does a lot of small projects where the hardware is just written as a list on the sheets or in the project manual, so I'm wondering if it's worth it (or possible) to use key schedules in situations like these or if I should just continue using the same method. However, before I can even consider trying "reinvent the wheel," I have to know what the heck I'm trying to reinvent.

        Would anyone be kind enough to share images (or Revit files) of their door schedule + door hardware schedules so I can get an idea of how other offices do these?

        Thanks in advance
        Back in my days as an Architect I worked at a fairly small firm that did door hardware like you describe. Just a list, sometimes on a sheet and sometimes just in the spec manual. I Started using a key schedule in Revit just to make it easier on myself in Revit. I can't remember if the key schedule itself from Revit ever made it into a set of documents, but I found using the key schedule in Revit made things easier just to keep track of while I was documenting the project.
        Jeff Hanson
        Sr. Subject Matter Expert
        Autodesk, Revit - User Experience

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Munkholm View Post
          I don´t do hardware schedules. The Hardware MF will typically do all the tedious work, and provide us with different "sets of hardware" customized for our projects, and based on the handle design etc. of our choice (even before bid round) - So in the doors and the door schedule, we use a "Hardware Set" shared parameter, and just fill that with "Set A", "Set B", or whatever set fits the door.
          Munkholm,
          So in your case, you receive a document that lists what's included in "Set A," "Set B," etc., you stick it in your specifications, and coordinate that list with your door schedule using the shared parameter for "Hardware Set?" Our door schedule currently includes a similar shared parameter, as well (that I have not used yet).

          Originally posted by snowyweston View Post
          To date, we've yet to produce our ironmongery package out of Revit, but I'm getting there - and have it ready in our doors, I just need the "right job" with the "right people" to get into our schedules.

          But as with Klaus, we're never as explicit as "Hafale Cat No. XX" because of our contracts - and use spec-tied "codes" to keep things flexible in our models. No way are we at the stage of modelling each and every piece of ironmongery in a healthcare door - so it's purely parametric.

          Until of course someone goes and asks to see them in interior renders that is...
          Just to show my noob-ness, I never even knew the word "ironmongery" was an actual term. For some reason, I thought it was some sort of slang for...well, who knows what I was thinking. I was talking more about the parameters and not so much the actual modeling.

          Originally posted by JeffH View Post
          Back in my days as an Architect I worked at a fairly small firm that did door hardware like you describe. Just a list, sometimes on a sheet and sometimes just in the spec manual. I Started using a key schedule in Revit just to make it easier on myself in Revit. I can't remember if the key schedule itself from Revit ever made it into a set of documents, but I found using the key schedule in Revit made things easier just to keep track of while I was documenting the project.
          JeffH,
          Would you be able to elaborate a little more on how using the key schedule made it easier to keep track of things? I've read that some people have used key schedules to set types of doors and the head/jamb/threshold details associated with them, while others have used key schedules to list the types of hardware that come included with each door such as closers, etc. Is it that you used the key schedule to automate filling in the schedule and keep things coordinated that way instead of individually filling out each box in the schedule?





          Thanks for your replies!

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            #6
            Originally posted by darryl View Post
            JeffH,
            Would you be able to elaborate a little more on how using the key schedule made it easier to keep track of things? I've read that some people have used key schedules to set types of doors and the head/jamb/threshold details associated with them, while others have used key schedules to list the types of hardware that come included with each door such as closers, etc. Is it that you used the key schedule to automate filling in the schedule and keep things coordinated that way instead of individually filling out each box in the schedule?
            When I did used a key schedule it was in the 2nd example you provided. I created a key schedule with Hardware group 1, 2, 3, etc... each group had closer, lock function, kickplates, etc... Everything that could possibly be on a door. Then each group would have what ever combination was needed. Then I assoigned the "keys" as instance parameters on my doors. I probably did not need to use the key schedule to do this. I just found it easier for me to keep track of.
            Jeff Hanson
            Sr. Subject Matter Expert
            Autodesk, Revit - User Experience

            Comment


              #7
              Hi All,

              Also a noobie, just getting into Revit. We work on a range of project sizes and while I have used the hardware set option occasionally, we would also on occasion itemise out each element of ironmongery on a door to door basis, normally tied in to an NBS reference. I am assuming in this instance, I will just have to add in separate parameters for each item (closer, hinge, lock, handle, etc) to the doors and then schedule them out as before.

              Taking it a stage further though - having begun to try it out and even managing take-off for each ironmongery item (just doing this in a small scale trial), it does leave me with another question. On a large project I could be faced with a reasonable number of variations of each item even several different types of hinges across a project. No one is going to want to model items like hinges and nest them into doors, just in order to give them their own set of parameters eg. fire rating, security, style, material, size, no off per leaf, etc). Is there any way round that (I have thought of creating a simple symbol that could be invisible in all views, but even that seems like a lot of trouble, especially when multiplied out of each element of ironmongery).
              Last edited by SteveRM25; August 19, 2014, 02:27 PM. Reason: further thoughts

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